Looking for IGBT amplifier schematics?

Here is one I designed a few years ago.
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All the IGBT I tested: extremely high resolution, extremely fine, but very hazy, foggy, tired.
I dont see how an amp can be hazy and foggy, yet extremely High resolution. To me that would be low resolution.

Your experience has probably been with underbiased IGBTs/Mosfets. In principle, designing an audio amp with them is not much different from using N-channel switching-optimized mosfets. The input characteristics are the same. What “the big deal” is, is low effective Rds(on). At typically much heavier loads than 4 or 8 ohm speakers - and if you add source/emitter resistors as is customary for thermal stability you just defeated any on resistance advantage. They probably are more rugged in the linear region than todays crop of switching mosfets. And you can buy really big ones, eliminating the need for paralleling.
 
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There was a thread here, somebody wanted details about P-channel IGBTs.
He disappeared after I said why, what about the N-channels you will also need.
And the IGBT from Toshiba used in that amp are long obsolete.

To my knowledge, only one company in India makes those amps, no idea what they use for transistors.

So, why do you want to try an abandoned design, and those are like 300 WRMS, IIRC.
Not needed unless PA or stadium, not even a cinema needs 7 channels @ 300W.

IGBTs are good for drives and so on, and there exist alternates in chip amps, Mosfet, BJT, and others for audio amp purposes.

I know of no IGBTs intended for audio amps in current production, you will have to use devices intended for other purposes.

Unless you want to learn a lot, my free advice is to make something that is proven, and enjoy the music.
 
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I dont see how an amp can be hazy and foggy, yet extremely High resolution. To me that would be low resolution.
Your experience has probably been with underbiased IGBTs/Mosfets.
It is the "curtain" that is drawn into the sound. The individual sound of each component. Also describable as "colored and/or dirty glass wall".
And: There are significant sonic differences, characters between the different transistors MosFet and Bipolar. And also IGBT. And it does not matter in which place, in which function they are used.
I would advise against larger construction types. Again, the reason is the lower definition of the current, the signal.
 
All the IGBT I tested: extremely high resolution, extremely fine, but very hazy, foggy, tired.
IGBTs were originally intended to be used as switching devices, not as devices that would be biased up into a linear operating region. You can do that, I 'spoze, but why bother? With the bipolar & MOSFET devices we have available, I see no point in using IGBTs in that application, since the BJT's and MOSFETs are more than up to the task.
 
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Where do you play high power amps ?

In any case, none are intended for audio use by the makers.

I do know of a maker who uses IGBT drives for voltage controllers, response time is 15 mS, and volts to within +/- 1 V at 220V
Those are Fairchild devices, you can search for them.
The company's controller range starts at single phase 1 kW, and goes up to about 250 kW, 3 phase.

1 kW / channel output at home?
Seriously?
What about the flat response and the rest?
 
We are in a DIY forum for power amplifier, IGBT are for power use : Why we can't use it for power amplifier ? It is for knowledge :)
I suppose you have different range of power IGBT ?
MOSFET are also very difficult to make linear power amp with, not very linear this device, it is a switch ! and hard to drive with the Cgs capacity.
IGBT seems a little easier to use.
 
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