• WARNING: Tube/Valve amplifiers use potentially LETHAL HIGH VOLTAGES.
    Building, troubleshooting and testing of these amplifiers should only be
    performed by someone who is thoroughly familiar with
    the safety precautions around high voltages.

On Line Tube Learning for newbies....

JoeAlders

Member
2011-02-12 10:20 am
  • Module 1 - Matter, Energy, and Direct Current (Jun 2011)
  • Module 2 - Alternating Current and Transformers (Mar 2012)
  • Module 3 - Circuit Protection, Control, and Measurement (Feb 2013)
  • Module 4 - Electrical Conductors, Wiring Techniques, and Schematic Reading (May 2013)
  • Module 5 - Generators and Motors (Sep 2011)
  • Module 6 - Electronic Emission, Tubes, and Power Supplies (Mar 2012)
  • Module 7 - Solid-State Devices and Power Supplies (Aug 2012)
  • Module 8 - Amplifiers (Feb 2013)
  • Module 9 - Wave-Generation and Wave-Shaping Circuits (Jul 2012)
  • Module 10 - Wave Propagation, Transmission Lines, and Antennas (Jul 2012)
  • Module 11 - Microwave Principles (Feb 2012)
  • Module 12 - Modulation (Jan 2012)
  • Module 13 - Number Systems and Logic Circuits (Jan 2012)
  • Module 14 - Inroduction to Microelectronics (Sep 2003)
  • Module 15 - Principles of Synchros, Servos, and Gyros (Dec 2012)
  • Module 16 - Test Equipment (Apr 2013)
  • Module 17 - Radio-Frequency Communications Principles (Apr 2013)
  • Module 18 - Radar Principles (Apr 2013)
  • Module 19 - The Technician's Handbook (Jan 2004)
  • Module 20 - Master Glossary (Jan 2004)
  • Module 21 - Test Methods and Practices (May 2013)
  • Module 22 - Digital Computing (May 2013)
  • Module 23 - Magnetic Recording (May 2013)
  • Module 24 - Fiber Optics (Jun 2014)

http://www.compatt.com/Tutorials/NEETS/NEETS.html
Thanks Ken.
Much appreciated!
 
At this point, I believe it is important to remember that the previous info provides just the basics of design engineering.
Even when earning a degree, one has only the elementary tools, such as equations, understanding tube/ss parameters,
etc. These tools are necessary, along with physics etc for further research and development.

cheers

pos
 

JoeAlders

Member
2011-02-12 10:20 am
At this point, I believe it is important to remember that the previous info provides just the basics of design engineering.
Even when earning a degree, one has only the elementary tools, such as equations, understanding tube/ss parameters,
etc. These tools are necessary, along with physics etc for further research and development.

cheers

pos

How true is this! One also has to try to solve basic problems supplied in a book about vacuum tube theory to get some feeling
how to calculate basic tube circuits. Like this one:
https://www.diyaudio.com/community/threads/on-line-tube-learning-for-newbies.38278/page-12
Just a humble contribution.
 
How true is this! One also has to try to solve basic problems supplied in a book about vacuum tube theory to get some feeling
how to calculate basic tube circuits. Like this one:
https://www.diyaudio.com/community/threads/on-line-tube-learning-for-newbies.38278/page-12
Just a humble contribution.

Yes, that is part of basic learning one learns in college classrooms. I could have explained more in my previous post.

An example of something learned after college.

I don't know if this has been mentioned earlier, but when two components in a system have pin 1 connected to the wall socket, there
is a connection between the signal ground to both components. As such, musical information/signal current not only returns via both
left and right interconnect shields, but also through the pin 1 wires from component to component. This tends to mix the channels
together. There is all sorts of negative ramifications.

I have to admit that Jneutron first brought this forth about a decade ago. So simple yet profound and never mentioned.

cheers

pos