H2 V2 BUILD

The one and only
Joined 2001
Paid Member
Insofar as the H2 give-away sign up thread has become tediously long,
I am posting the build documentation here.

I am also happy to say that for those of you that missed the group
effort, it appears that the diyAudio store will soon offer these at a
nice cheap price.

:snail:
 

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While searching through my two favourite resistor manufacturers (a taiwanese and a chinese brand) I could not find one value in 1/2w (which is just above 0.4) like specified in the Digikey Parts. I can't imagine most of these resistors will be dissipating that much, so is quarter watt fine too?
 
Official Court Jester
Joined 2003
Paid Member
I'm interested in perhaps becoming a EU distributor of the DIY Audio store packages? PCB manufacturing is cheap, and with the parts I'll be ordering for the ones on the way I'll have stupid amounts of excess :p

is there any interest in that?

this is really not address for asking that

find a way to contact Jason, he is DiyAudio Honcho
 
Official Court Jester
Joined 2003
Paid Member
While searching through my two favourite resistor manufacturers (a taiwanese and a chinese brand) I could not find one value in 1/2w (which is just above 0.4) like specified in the Digikey Parts. I can't imagine most of these resistors will be dissipating that much, so is quarter watt fine too?

most project around are same in fact that majority of resistors are 0207 size

that's enough of info (99% of 0207 having same power, even if some factories are declaring 400mW, some 600mW), and if you want to go bellow that in size, you need to take care of specific position in circuit and dissipation
 
While searching through my two favourite resistor manufacturers (a taiwanese and a chinese brand) I could not find one value in 1/2w (which is just above 0.4) like specified in the Digikey Parts. I can't imagine most of these resistors will be dissipating that much, so is quarter watt fine too?

You might want to use the law of good old Ohm. If you know the current through the resistor or the voltage over it, you are able to calculate the power dissipation. U=R*I and P=U*I, P being the power. So a 221 Ohm resistor with e.g. 10mA will give you…? You have to substitute. P=R*I^2. Then you might want to derate it, give some margin.