Eminence Acquired by B&C

Member
Joined 2005
Paid Member
They are great drivers, and Made In (homeland where they were designed in) America, but are we all buying them? If not why not?

Are you sure they are very popular? How many units are they producing and selling per quarter?

Not not how really popular they are if Eminence were bought out for just $US 5M.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
Member
Joined 2005
Paid Member
Imagine that?

Just like what Barack wrote- America IS the Promised Land

I coulda seen ya there
@mordikai @5th element @Zvu @fluid @HiFiCompass @vineethkumar01 @hifijim @Arez @racingpht @bikinpunk @Juhazi @augerpro @shrub0 ... as well the rest of you addicted misfits @diyAudio .

Shall we vote for jobs? I'm pretty good at washing up, since there'll be plenty to do, what with your new Welcome mug on arrival:
Eat Sleep Speak(er)
Repeat

You hear that Elon? You're not the only one who can sleep at the hangar.

Just in time, since AI was going to take all our jobs anyway...
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: 3 users
My guess is Eminence had a lot of debt from expansion, so that’s why the price was low.

They aren’t efficient, a lot of jobs will be cut.

The financials are quite bizarre. The press release implies that B&C paid off Eminence's debt at acquisition time ("Details of the transaction released by B&C Speakers confirm that the acquisition of the two companies in US and China was agreed for a value of $4,495,000 (USD), which B&C Speakers financed using its own financial resources. Price paid to Eminence Holdings LLC, is $3,551,000, taking into considerations the companies financial obligations, ")

But the value of a 96,000 square foot warehouse should exceed the value of the entire company, I would think:

"In 2006, Eminence expanded its worldwide operations with the addition of Eminence Dongguan Enterprise Ltd. The 96,000 sq. ft. facility was part of the international Eminence effort to provide loudspeaker manufacturing capability in areas strategically located near manufacturers of musical instrument and professional audio products."

I used to work for Hewlett Packard, and one of the things I noticed about their financial disclosures was that HP nearly functions like a real-estate-investment-trust now. Basically, you look at HP, and wonder "how can this huge company exist on revenue from printer toner alone?" When the truth is that HP owns some of the most valuable real estate in the world. Their holdings are "special" because they're so large and contiguous. A few examples:

1) HP owned a campus near Houston that it acquired when it bought Compaq, back in the 90s. That campus is big enough to land a space shuttle, it's just a ridiculously huge chunk of real estate, in a relatively prime location.

2) HP owned a campus in San Diego that was absolutely huge, located across the street from Microsoft and Sony, and two blocks away from the HQ of Petco. Similar to #1, it isn't just that it's in a killer location, it's the sheer size of the campus that boggles the mind. It's much MUCH bigger than Amazon and Google's puny office, and may even be bigger than San Diego's crown jewel (Qualcomm.)

3) HP owns numerous campuses in Silicon Valley like that

4) T-Mobile's HQ in Bellevue WA may be leased from HP. This is a confusing one: basically, when T-Mobile moved in, they took it over from Attachmate. Attachmate was acquired by HP quite a while ago. But parts of HP have been spun off into HPE and MicroFocus. IIRC, MicroFocus wound up with the Attachmate assets. Of course, it's possible that Attachmate was leasing their building in the first place, and it's also possible that T-Mobile purchased their HQ at some point. I was there when T-Mo moved in to the building, and I distinctly recall dumpsters full of Attachmate stuff getting discarded. But the number of mergers and acquisitions in the ensuing years makes my head spin.

But these are gettins sloooowly sold off. Apple's HQ sits on land that was formerly HP, and so does Apple's new campus in San Diego. I'm not sure who bought the Houston campus, but I heard that everyone who worked there transferred out years ago. The last time I went to the Houston campus, it was practically a ghost town, about 10% occupied. So I'm guessing they spent close to a decade getting their 'ducks in a row.'
 
  • Like
Reactions: 5 users
They are great drivers,
Well, I don't know.

I am definitely not saying they are bad, but I always have an hard time advising those compared to other brands like B&C.

On the bigger picture it's interesting.
18 Sound was already bought over by B&C , now Eminence as well.

Hopefully we're not getting similar things like Analog Devices etc....


That being said, B&C as well as 18 Sound are absolutely wonderful companies to work with.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 users
But the value of a 96,000 square foot warehouse should exceed the value of the entire company, I would think:

"In 2006, Eminence expanded its worldwide operations with the addition of Eminence Dongguan Enterprise Ltd. The 96,000 sq. ft. facility was part of the international Eminence effort to provide loudspeaker manufacturing capability in areas strategically located near manufacturers of musical instrument and professional audio products."

‘It’s north of Shenzhen. China’s not doing so good right now.

Again (guess) that they leveraged their US property and stock value to build that slav.. er, “campus” and probably spent a lot on brib..er, ”consessions”.

Setting up production in China often leads to financial ruin, the pandemic didn’t help.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 2 users
That does sound awfully low
It's hard to find data on this from major providers, but it looks like in 2022 Eminence Speaker LLC had US$11.9 million in revenue and $481,000 in EBITDA. Assuming that is correct, the price seems in-line or higher than other private company acquisitions I've heard about recently.

Just looking at the sales and profit, anyway. I don't know what their real estate/equipment holdings are like, but equipment is typically worth next to nothing at auction.

The Eminence Dongguang side supposedly had revenue of $6.5 million and EBITDA of $1.1 million. Who knows how reliable that data is though or whether there were extenuating circumstances inflating things. This came from a poorly translated summary, so hopefully it's all interpreted correctly.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: 2 users