Cyrus CD7 repair

Hi there. Anyone have any idea where to get this switch from a Cyrus cd 7 it's part 1810 on the optical transport Controll board. Can't find a service manual for this model anywhere!

Thanks in advance
 

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For any future humans looking for this info it's Philips part 4822 276 13503 doesn't seem to be available anywhere but the same board is used in the Philips cd723 and several others. I've had to buy one with a dead lazer to fix my cyrus. 15 quid for the player but quite a lot for just a tiny microswitch
 
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Hi,
I was authorized warranty for Cyrus. That PCB did not have any information and was supplied to Cyrus with the mechanism. The service information does not include that section. So you did exactly what Cyrus or I would have to do - except that I can sometimes fix the darned things. Very few problems with it even though it isn't made well.

It's too bad, because anything and everything Cyrus actually made was top notch and well engineered.

Who can you thank for the crappy CDMs and that mystery PCB? Philips of course. That's why Cyrus ditched Philips after this model, many other manufacturers did the same thing. Finally enough was enough. By the way, over 50% defect rate on new CDMs from Philips (Chinese made). That doesn't include very poorly performing ones with terrible eye patterns that worked. I have never in my life seen such horrible quality and QC.

The microswitch? Was it broken? I have never seen a bad one that cleaning the contacts didn't fix.
 
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No, I'm afraid there isn't.

Thanks for posting, I'm glad you have it going. It is a nice player when it has a decent head in it.

Those switches are usually found in a number of things - just have fun finding them. It was easier when there was a part number and spares at the repair agency. Those days are long gone.
 
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Hi Nigel,
The contacts may need cleaning. If the switch breaks, it will not be intermittent. It simply would stop working.

If the machine was used a lot, you may have a weak laser, or a bad disc motor. Do not attempt to adjust anything, if it was working in the past (it was) the adjustments are okay. Turning any controls will only create another problem.
 
Was this the limit switch for the loading mechanism? Most philips CDMs had these and you'd be able to find a parts donor unit on ebay. The older philips / magnavox CDPs had alot of issue with electrolytic caps going bad after the 40+ years they've been around.
 
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Hi Nigel,
Be aware that these transports are simply the very worst I have ever seen (a big thanks to Philips). Total failure rates with brand new transports sent from Cyrus was about 50%. No joke, these ones didn't read period. Cyrus was one that got the highest quality parts. Now, this doesn't count the transports that performed very poorly. They played a CD, not well and would fail sooner than later.

We got entire CDM transports, we didn't play with heads or motors as they were not available in pieces.

This is really sad, because Cyrus makes excellent products. They relied on Philips for the transports as they had for years, and many other manufacturers. So all I will say to you is to consider this. If you are not a tech really use to working on CD players and can tell a good transport from a bad one, either take your machine to a good tech, or replace it. Your good tech may refuse to work on it, and if he does it is because he knows it may take several replacements before finding a okay one (notice I didn't say good). A tech with poor ethics will slap the new one in and give it back to you as long as it works. A bad tech doesn't even know to check. The test points are not documented or marked. Experience is key here.

-Chris
 
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Hi profiguy,
The Cyrus machines are markedly better made and designed than the Philips machines.

The problems normally stem from a terribly made CDM. Philips designed an extremely cheap one, then had it built in China where almost zero quality controls were in place. The VAM transports are the worst I have seen.
 
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Thank you all for your comments, I am trying to drill down a HI-Fi repair specialist in the UK. But I feel better prepared to ask a few meaningful questions before handing over my brick. I am guessing find an OK Philips drive is the key, and there is no other manufacturer that can be fitted into the CD7, a real shame because when paired with the Cyrus 7 amplifier it gives a pleasing sound.
 
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Hi Nigel,
I completely agree. I was the Canadian service manager at that time.

Thinking on this a bit. Normally I would never suggest this, but a copy available in China may even be better quality since now the vendor has to support them. I haven't looked, but here is hoping.
 
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Philips typically called them "CDM", you could search for "Mechanism", VAM120? (I forget). Laser head assembly for your make and model. I normally search for the exact mechanism number or laser head number. I don't have any open to look, but on the transport somewhere you will see something like "Philips VAM120x". I can't remember what the exact number is, something like VAM1201 for example.

Edit: I searched for VM1201 and came up with several results, from entire transports to just the head.

If it were me, I'd go for the mechanism complete, not just the head, you don't need the loader (tray) assy. I would not buy the least expensive either. If it was for a customer, I would buy two knowing the history of these things. One nice thing about having a spare. It's a new machine when you change all that.

-Chris
 
Sounds like you have a VAM series PU, which were absolutely garbage. I had a Dynaco CDV1 with a 1201 PU, which skipped ALL THE TIME. It was such a nice sounding piece with a pair of 6922 tubes in the output buffer, but the PU rendered it useless. I had to go through 3 of them to get one that actually played somewhat acceptably. Even with spotless brand new CDs it still mis tracked.

The older single beam swing arm CDMs are by far the best transports I've owned. Sad they don't make them anymore. They played everything, even CDRs.
 
Thank you all for your comments, I am trying to drill down a HI-Fi repair specialist in the UK. But I feel better prepared to ask a few meaningful questions before handing over my brick. I am guessing find an OK Philips drive is the key, and there is no other manufacturer that can be fitted into the CD7, a real shame because when paired with the Cyrus 7 amplifier it gives a pleasing sound.
I have a brand new VAM1201 in the package which I'd be willing to give you free. I have no use for it anymore. Just PM me your address and its yours.
 
Swing Philips mechanism are such distant past that most 20 years old CD players have one of those VAM mechs and Philips Pro is also a VAM type. If they were so bad nothing would be playing after a few months of use and most of those pesky plastic VAM's are still playing strong. You do have to buy from a reputable seller (Liberty Electronics for example) who has reliable and consistent source in China from supplier who does have decent quality control. It is what it is.
 
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Hi limono,
Completely untrue. Sorry.

If you got a good one, it played fine. I saw one with what I would call a good eye pattern. Most were garbage, really poor quality. Count yourself lucky!

The very best CD transport ever was made by NEC, used in the Nakamichi OMS-5/7, and an Alpine unit. Probably others as well. Nothing else ever came close.

Every mechanism - servo combination has defects they deal well with, and others they don't. The Philips swing arm had pluses, as do the various Sony transports. Every try to mechanically align a Philips swing arm? Forget it. Even Studer/Revox relegated it to a replace subassembly and they tried - so did I. Never mind the ghastly expensive glass CD you needed. The NEC was a handful, but I got very good with those. The various Sony mechanisms could be set up much more easily, same for Sanyo (remember the SF-90 ~ 92?). I like the KSS-151A transport. We laughed at the KSS-150A / 210A transport. Well, most are still going and we CAN rebuild those.
 
The problem is you can't count on the transports being original Philips. Most of them are counterfeit or generic, just like they did with the old Sony KSA/KSM series pickups. At least with those you know its a knockoff if there was no bronze bushing sleeve insert. Those were awful too and also wouldn't play CDRs.