Bits and more bits

Been having trouble finding Frued rolling cutters with 1/4 shanks locally.

I found the type I use manufactured by a company called Diablo for similar costs, for top roller flush cutters. They aren't cheap either cost compares to Frued but how about life expectancy?

Because I may wana go back and hoard a few..just in case.
 
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Sounds like a possible case of let's dupe the customer through more marketing trickery.

..kinda like two chances to win it, if they don't buy our choice A maybe our choice option B will hook em with its different packaging.

I knew I seen those Diablo bits somewhere. But its 1st time learning of the name.
 
I'ved used same bits from both brands, started using diablo which was available in the local hardware store, when it came time to get new bits I got freud. Both seem fine for use on my cheap Makita router as well as my Festool OF1010. I supposed time will tell the story of how the freud bits go over long term use but the diablos lasted me a few years of casual use.
 
There could be a difference in the material grade, even tool steel has many grades.
And some expensive cutters are coated with Titanium Carbide, among other things.
And some cheap cutters are coated for long life.

See a competitive brand, in India most people who are operating CNC vertical mills use far cheaper Chinese and Korean tools, the Japanese are a little more expensive.
Sandvik, Widia and others are wildly expensive in comparison. They do find a use in difficult jobs, where the cost is not super critical.

For casual use, buy the best you can afford, which is your decision.

I have no ties to any company above.
 
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Life's too short for crap tools. It's happened more than once that I've started out with a crap tool because I'd only use it "casually". Then I ended up using it more than I thought and hated using it. Bought the better tool. Not thereby said that you should buy the most expensive.

Tom
 
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I used a Whiteside upcut to recess an aluminum faceplate for the rotary switches..
The bit isn't dull yet and retained original sharpness. Don't know how many faceplates I can cut from one bit.
 

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Hi Joel Wesseling. Thats pretty much what I plan to cut 1/4" to house some 2 1/2" circular car guages.

After seeing a members line array baffle.. I think a fresh Diablo bit will cut through it like an Xmas day turkey.

I would not mind killing a blade for the cause but its nice to hear It won't.

Just try to distribute the work load evenly by raising and lowering the piece. The bearing prevents another method depending what bit is used.

Theres still learning curves with a router but so far so good.
 
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I only had a chance to buy the aluminium. I never had to pay for metals before id sooner hit uncles scrap cut off in his supply house. A bit shocked by cost.

But I went right for the jewelry best one they had stocked so I better not mess this one up lol.

I can't capture it by camera on my best day its illusive. Its a super fine brush finished on the good side
 

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Tom the saws have been a reoccurring thought for multiple things I'm forseeing going potentially bad using the rotary cutter. And then jigsaw to do the slot cutout for the head unit. I cut the first that way and it went perfect.

When I cut out the circles I should of used it. Instead I hogged 4 holes with a spade bit then nipped what was left out with the jigsaw.

I figured I can tidy those cuts up easily later. Didnt go that way..

The sizes are on mark everything fits but they look sloppy af without the bezels there to mask it. Ill work up some nerve and unveil my butchery job later.
 
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I used the 24 mm for cutting holes for XLR and speakON connectors in a build for a client. It was a 4-channel amp so there were lots of holes. The panel was by ModuShop. Steel... Hard steel. I basically treated the cutter as a disposable item. It went just fine. All the holes were round and in the right place at the end. :)

Tom