Australia on fire

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Yes, none of the Aboriginal communities are really affected. Most are in remote desert areas.

Interestingly, when it was just them inhabiting this land, they deliberately employed bush fires constructively. Note that they were generally nomadic.

Fire-stick farming - Wikipedia



How are managed the aborigens in the country side, here in EU we heard a lot about Koala and kangarous at TV but nothing about isolated populations? Is it safer cause the fires are mostly near the costs ?

That's just incredible the numbers of people than authoritys are moving with calm and good organisation. Kudos... here I believe people will run in all directions !

Time to stop coal for electricity purpose and a worldwide Marshall Plan against global warming to reduce the futur events to be worser ?

Anyway, so sorry for Oz and its great people.
 
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I have noticed over the last few years in the supermarkets a huge increase in the amount of fresh fruit from places as far afield as Chile, Argentina, Peru. I won't buy it when we have hot countries on our doorstep - relatively speaking. I think we must be looking at the hidden costs in products - in this case increased air travel. Trading further afield is set to increase for us.
As for passenger travel, it seems we should let the 'train take the strain' to use an old British train company ad. I found an interesting website giving environmental impacts for plane , train and car in Europe.
EcoPassenger

Comparing a journey from London to Nice was quite an eye opener. We're thinking of taking the train this summer for a holiday based in Carcassonne (southern France). It's some 13 hours from home but we like trains - especially in Europe.
Of course the benefits of the train over flying vary from country to country depending on the availability of electric trains and the means of generating electricity for example.
 
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Just some trivia:

- Belgium just recently abolished extra child support for large families;

- The Dutch are building a Hyperloop proof-of-concept track in the North of the country after a Dutch University won a challenge for best design.

Things like that show there IS progress, albeit excruciatingly slow.

Jan
 
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It’s instructive to think about the fact that we exist in a very thin sliver about 10 miles thick. Venture beyond that and humans and 99% of all life as we know it cannot exist.

If you add all the solid surface area of all the bodies in the solar system, the Earth’s continents represent about 20% and as far as we know, the only place that can support life. So we really are just floating on this little piece of rock and our existence is quite tenuous in the big scheme of things.

As someone remarked ‘we’re screwing up this planet as if we have some place else to go. We don’t’
 
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The consumption of energy and the destruction of the atmosphere is correlated to overpopulation, but no government dares going there........ China tried with single child policy in 1978, but even they have given up.......

HD

Pumping carbon into the atmosphere is the biggest danger IMV. 40 billion tons a year and the total pumped into the atmosphere the last 150 years is 2.5 trillion tons.

Coal fired power generation has to go and the big four emitters (C, I, A, E) have to stop it. Even if Oz overnight became a zero emissions economy, it would not stop the type of disaster we are seeing today.
 
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It’s instructive to think about the fact that we exist in a very thin sliver about 10 miles thick. Venture beyond that and humans and 99% of all life as we know it cannot exist.

If you add all the solid surface area of all the bodies in the solar system, the Earth’s continents represent about 20% and as far as we know, the only place that can support life. So we really are just floating on this little piece of rock and our existence is quite tenuous in the big scheme of things.

As someone remarked ‘we’re screwing up this planet as if we have some place else to go. We don’t’

Well said... that's children words whom makes me realise with phrases like "what did you do (adults)", "WTF with Mars, we are no able to help Earth", "flight and I leave the house!" (By feet I assume, lol)

They all watch the TV with some sadness and dream not about cosmonauts today...

@Jan, yes but we not must try now, we must sucess and it's not about engineery, it's about wisdom, people management to reduce personal impact on Earth... means no selfish behavior. Aussie lost twice the aera of Belgium in smoke.

As for aborigens, they were hunting with bush fires (at least they have the art to control it a precise way), farming everywhere with fire is known but it was before... Now things like fires in Aussie, California, Brazil and so on (Russia steps, European woods as well, etc) are bad for everyone on the planet.

No plane for me anymore btw, don't want to be seen by the youngs as a plate disc world plate world complotist. I like people from Aussie and angwhere, their countries, but first I like them alives.
 
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The greatest danger is not what we're pumping into the atmosphere but rather firstly our destruction of the oceans which are wholly responsible for regulating the C02 in the atmosphere, and secondly our progressive destruction of our forests. The atmosphere itself is actually the incidental third alarm.



But those with the greatest vested interest are the ones enabling the climate change smoke screen in order to rape the world for profit.


There's a book written a couple thousand years ago that declares the sequence: first we will destroy the ocean, next the land, and finally the air. We seem to be fulfilling that little prophecy.
 
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Imho, not sure you get it in the right order Discopete. But anyway same results.
CO2 We pump into the air in too big quantity is a great contributor to the warming then contribute to weak the oceans machine because the heat - so less co2 absorption. Look at of course the seaweeds and especially micro ones -phytoplankton- you certainly refer to but also Gulf Stream working for instance... a disaster if this last one stops because thermic desiquilibrium. Also the desiquilibrium of global fishing contributes too because the ocean food chain , some species that eat the phytoplankton stock it in their skeleton, then co2 is dissolved in the ocean floors after they die if not eaten. Notice cold water absorbs much more co2 than hotter one. Phytoplankton is important in co2 to o2 transformation but oceans contributes to 25% of co2 absorption today.

Well of course if I u derstood correctly what I have read... which is not sure as my brain has less o2 those days :D

Electricity production with coal is an important co2 contributor, consequence of our needs, industries, internet. Animal farming as transportations too. It's just everyone will that can reduces such emission quantities. Coal is needed not only for electricity but look at some countries like Spain and China, when you have sun solar panel or solar tower are efficient.:) ... while the most efficient is to reduce our needs or live with the fact it's at elseone advantage.

Eucalyptus forests of Aussie needs 10 to 15 years for adult trees which is short... but if fires are too huge every year it will not be possible, too much eat qn sterilizs soils then growing is slowed. I read aborigens had a fire management of trees cause eucalyptus trees needs burnings... but it was under controll by seculary technic and use of the pilling barks made by these trees (used as fire source by the nomads that lived there for 57 000 years). If the heat plus eucalyptus oil make it unmanagable with such monstruous forest fire then we should all contribute to less co2 emission. Human memory and denie are working fine halas... with spring and winter, people will continue as before till next summer. Btw sorry for the long post, it's also pollution...
 
While the current bushfires are a catastrophe and the devastation huge, I think it is worth remembering that fires in Australia are not new, nor are droughts which precipitate these events. Was climate change a factor in the 19th century?

This poem was written in 1904 by a 19 year, Dorothea Mackellar; I have bolded the relevant lines.

My Country
A poem by Dorothea Mackellar 1904

The love of field and coppice
Of green and shaded lanes,
Of ordered woods and gardens
Is running in your veins.
Strong love of grey-blue distance,
Brown streams and soft, dim skies
I know, but cannot share it,
My love is otherwise.

I love a sunburnt country,
A land of sweeping plains,
Of ragged mountain ranges,
Of droughts and flooding rains.
I love her far horizons,
I love her jewel-sea,
Her beauty and her terror
The wide brown land for me!


The stark white ring-barked forests,
All tragic to the moon,
The sapphire-misted mountains,
The hot gold hush of noon,
Green tangle of the brushes
Where lithe lianas coil,
And orchids deck the tree-tops,
And ferns the warm dark soil.

Core of my heart, my country!
Her pitiless blue sky,
When, sick at heart, around us
We see the cattle die

But then the grey clouds gather,
And we can bless again
The drumming of an army,
The steady soaking rain.

Core of my heart, my country!
Land of the rainbow gold,
For flood and fire and famine
She pays us back threefold.

Over the thirsty paddocks,
Watch, after many days,
The filmy veil of greenness
That thickens as we gaze ...

An opal-hearted country,
A wilful, lavish land
All you who have not loved her,
You will not understand
though Earth holds many splendours,
Wherever I may die,
I know to what brown country
My homing thoughts will fly
 
Thanks to the diyaudio community for your sympathetic response to our fires.
50 years ago I heard that there were three vulnerable areas, in what were then seen as First World or Developed countries, that were prone to destructive fires. (I am aware it IS a very First World perspective and ignored Africa and other vulnerable places. My apologies to the rest of the world. I'm just repeating what was said.)
These were (i) the South coast of my old home State of Victoria, (ii) the French Riviera and (iii) California.
I notice that in the last few years Portugal and Greece have been added to the areas of Europe under threat and the Californian experience seems more intense than previously.
So it looks like many places are going to suffer more extensively in the future.
Thanks again and to those outside Australia who are making donations for relief work: much appreciated.
God bless, Jonathan
 
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While the current bushfires are a catastrophe and the devastation huge, I think it is worth remembering that fires in Australia are not new, nor are droughts which precipitate these events. Was climate change a factor in the 19th century?

This poem was written in 1904 by a 19 year, Dorothea Mackellar; I have bolded the relevant lines.

Reminds me of a 1919 John O'Brien poem: Said Hanrahan - Wikipedia
 
I lived outside of Vandenberg AFB CA (near Lompoc) in 1963-65.

I remember the Santa Anna winds and fires even back then. Today they are much worse, although at least the temp inversions don't produce the brown soup they did back then in the LA basin.

I am truly sorry to hear of the devastation in Australia.

Some compare it to the Amazon, however the fires in the Amazon are for the most part man-made.

To me this makes the fires in Australia that much worse as they are for the most part naturally occurring due to environmental changes.

Prayers and sympathies to those in the path of the conflagration.
 
I don't think anyone in Australia thinks drought and fires are a new phenomenon.

Interestingly, these fires are in some cases creating their own weather cell, causing thunderstorms which then may cause further fire through lightning strikes on extremely dry bushland.
 
How's this for bizarre. A fairly big bushfire was started here by a car towing a boat, where the bearings failed on the trailer, wheel fell off, hub hit the road and sparks were caused. The extremely dry grass on the side of the road caught and the 70 km/h winds did the rest. It doesn't take much at the moment!
 
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