What is the Universe expanding into..

Do you think there was anything before the big bang?

  • I don't think there was anything before the Big Bang

    Votes: 42 12.2%
  • I think something existed before the Big Bang

    Votes: 141 41.1%
  • I don't think the big bang happened

    Votes: 41 12.0%
  • I think the universe is part of a mutiverse

    Votes: 161 46.9%

  • Total voters
    343
To justify that amplifier it would be a mistake to pair it with a couple of low sensitivity bookshelf speakers, need something with high sensitivity to fully benefit from the lower noise floor. 96db/w or better, or you would not be able to hear the difference between that and a T. Amp 4-700.
I am sorry, you do not understand the market this, or the others I mentioned, is aimed at. Not everyone wants 120 dB acid rock in their living room.
 
Destortion is a 20th century problem . In Today's world😁 anything can sound great . If parts aren't counterfeit
Only true for some electronics if a competent engineer not over-ruled by marketing. Distortion in transceivers is still very much a problem. Speakers and mics. Building a bookshelf to play comfortable music below 2% is very difficult and very expensive.

We are WAY off topic here. Say, how is the JWT doing? Just flying along on it's way last I heard. Sunshield has been deployed. Pittsburgh got a bang, 27 metric ton explosion of a meteor.

I still say, gravity is a force and it has a particle to carry it. We may not be able to discover it, but nature likes the easy way out and re-used rules a lot. Einstein was able to brilliantly describe observations in GR, but that does not mean it is right.
 

Galu

Member
2018-04-17 6:50 pm
Pittsburgh got a bang, 27 metric ton explosion of a meteor.

Interesting! :cool:

Satellites designed to observe lightning can also pick up meteors.

They detected a "tiny, green blip" at the time of the boom.


NASA said the object’s size was about a yard in diameter with a mass close to half a ton. If it hadn’t been cloudy, NASA said a fireball would have been easily visible, about 100 times brighter than the full moon.
 
I am sorry, you do not understand the market this, or the others I mentioned, is aimed at. Not everyone wants 120 dB acid rock in their living room.
I have no problem understanding what the intended market is, what I'm saying is that is perhaps not the best application for it, and I feel it's overpriced. To do this fully justice I would think the best application for the amplifier circuit itself: feeding a high sensitivity midrange part of an active speaker (because of rising distortion in higher frequencies).

Most people will probably use it with a low-ish efficiency bookshelf with the end result being: will not sound any different to using a much cheaper basic TPA3250 design, or any other value-for-money amplifier.

Now, about those expanding electric bills being used to make expanding windmills in a increasingly smaller world being attacked by expanding meteors, in an expanding universe...
 

Galu

Member
2018-04-17 6:50 pm

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Galu

Member
2018-04-17 6:50 pm
Your interesting link refers to "ultra-diffuse galaxies" or UDGs.

They are so spread out that they are close to transparent and hard to observe.

This Wiki article says they have been studied since 1984 and were named UDGs in 2015: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ultra_diffuse_galaxy

"Based on discoveries confirmed in 2018, this class of galaxies includes both extremes of dark matter content: Some UDGs consist almost entirely of dark matter (such a galaxy may have the same size and mass as the Milky Way but a visible star count of only 1%), while other UDGs appear to be almost entirely free of dark matter."

So are UDGs devoid of dark matter or 99.9% dark matter? :scratch1: https://www.space.com/33850-weird-galaxy-is-mostly-dark-matter.html
 

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I share your excitement. JWST is the new Large Hadron Collider of the 2020 Decade:

https://webb.nasa.gov/content/webbLaunch/whereIsWebb.html?units=metric

Who knows what Cosmology will discover when Particle Physics and the Standard Model is stumbling? :D

TBH, the JWST is an odd looking thing. Maybe so ugly, it's beautiful as a friend of mine used to say. And it's all working so far.

Dark Matter, Dark Energy. MOND Gravity. All very mysterious. Of course I have my own theories. Space-Time is stranger than we think.

Europa Clipper looking more fun than a box of frogs too:

https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/missions/europa-clipper

Enough said.:)