were do i find some nice spikes?

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does anyone know were i can buy some nice looking spikes. All the ones i've seen so far are just an ugly metal cone. Some like the ones with Wilson speakers
http://www.wilsonaudio.com/details/index.html
or on Soliloquy
http://www.solspeak.com/index.html
would be nice

thanks,
ben

also, when i tryed posting this, it kept on saying "You must search the forum for an answer before posting a new thread." Does this mean i have to post a reply to someone elses, or do they want me to be on this site for a certain amount of time before i can post anything?
 
happyben3 said:
also, when i tryed posting this, it kept on saying "You must search the forum for an answer before posting a new thread." Does this mean i have to post a reply to someone elses, or do they want me to be on this site for a certain amount of time before i can post anything?

You must search the forums before you ask, because someone might allready asked/answered your question. :rolleyes:
 
Some of them Plumb Bobs are pretty good looking. That one came with my house and is probably 20 or 30 years old. Not exactly Wilson Audio, but pretty close. Both ends are threaded so it's easy to install and adjust. I wanted to post that picture previously but couldn't find the bob. Must have neglected renovations on the house because of all those amps.;)
 

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I know this is off topic but i couldn't resist it :
Why use Soundcare® SuperSpikes?
When the weight of your Hi-Fi equipment is concentrated onto a small area, the weight per square unit area increases enormously, providing better contact with the surface on which the unit stands. This results in an overall improved sound stage and increased control in the lower frequency register.

Nice piece of snake oil there:eek:

This statement is saying that when i increase the mass per unit area area of my HIFI equipment, the sound stage is improved and the bass 'register' has more control; without the slightest hint (in the entire artical) to why this happens !

I wanna see someone balance a brace of 4 aleph 5's on to 2 spikes, that must sound truly amazing :rolleyes:
 
Helix said:


I wanna see someone balance a brace of 4 aleph 5's on to 2 spikes, that must sound truly amazing :rolleyes:

It would be much easier to use 3 spikes instead of two. Untill recently I didn't care much for spikes, but when I got few of them for free I decided to try them out. Originally my DAC had 4 solid aluminum foots, 1.5" diameter by3/4" high. I replaced them with 3 spikes and apparently the bass was better defined and soundstage improved. I tried to use also supplied bases for the spikes, but the sound was better without them. I don't think it's snake oil anymore.:rolleyes:
Still, my 4 amps use phenolic foots. I just don't care to change them for spikes. Maybe I should thou?;)
 
Before I begin I want to say that I haven't studied spikes or there effects. That said, let me lend a guess as to there purpose.

To first order, the only difference from spiked and unspiked speakers is the amount of area of contact. Smaller tips = more pressure per tip. That shouldn't effect the response of the speaker, one iota, as friction does not depend on surface area.

But, to second order, the small tips dig into the surface that the speakers sit on. This causes the speaker to be better horizontally anchored to the floor. Perhaps there is less sliding, or whatever. I suppose that even minute motions will have an effect.

Perhaps this is all wrong, though. Maybe the reason is merely the uncoupling from the ground. Less of the sound is being transmitted into the floor, hence a better sound stage is produced. The sound comes from the speaker through the air, rather than through the ground.

I'm just throwing out these ideas. Anyone wish to comment?
You're not going to hurt my feelings.

-Dan
 
I have tried mounting 6.5" 2 way speaker cabs each on 3 automotive engine valve springs.
This worked quite well also.
The point of mounting a cabinet on three places is to choose the nodal mounting points by fine positioning.
This will affect/effect the voicing of the loudspeaker.
For equipment this works also, as does adding mass (I place two telephone books on top of my turntable).

Regards, Eric.
 

CHRIS8

Disabled Account
2001-12-12 8:47 am
VA, USA
Spikes WILL NOT decrease transmssion of energy to floor. In reality, if you have a wood floor with framing, and not a solid floor..you will cause ADDITIONAL resonances as compared to rubber feet. Spikes are pretty, and are excellent for placement on solid floors that are carpeted, due to the excellent stablility.

If presented with having to use spikes on a resonant floor, i would fabricate a 3/4' thick isolator layer, composed of very soft rubbers, possibly a few light duty springs for additonal support strength, and mounted to a plate integrated into the bottom of the speaker, the spikes would be mounted to this plate. But that is me.

MrFeedback's method would be effective. However, I would recommend additon of a damping device/mechanism to prevent the spring suspension from excessive oscillation.

Spikes on electronics? Improving sound? On solid state/digital equipment this is a myth. No evidence to support this. Speculation.

-Chris
 
from a personal prospective, spikes on speakers and subs make all the difference in the world. they take away that muddy, tubby, boom that bass can have. it cleans up the bass, tightens the midrange, and adds a velvet feel to the symnetry between the two.

im not too sure about the spring idea though. some companies use suspension spikes, wilson and dynaudio to name a few, but i believe that theirs use hydraulic. this is fluid, meaning that the fluid has dampening qualities iself, whereas springs will actually resonate. plus, unless you have like 2 12" or more per speaker, this will NOT make a difference, it will hurt if anything.

i would go with just simple spikes. they isolate the reverberation to just 4 point tips on your contact floor. this reduces the amount of sound that travels to your walls, floor, celing, etc... but some knida suspension spike isnt needed except for extreme cases.

and as far as using spikes for electronic equipment (for the purpose of it sounding better), HAHAHAHAHAHA! it does nothing. even cd players have error-correction and you could shake most modern transports and the sound would still get there the same. equipment is NOT effected by movement, let alone small tiny vibrations. think about it, how could that possibly change anything? with records i could understand, but not with solid state...
 
cowanrg said:


and as far as using spikes for electronic equipment (for the purpose of it sounding better), HAHAHAHAHAHA! it does nothing. even cd players have error-correction and you could shake most modern transports and the sound would still get there the same. equipment is NOT effected by movement, let alone small tiny vibrations. think about it, how could that possibly change anything? with records i could understand, but not with solid state...

We'll see what you say on that when you finish your Aleph and get better speakers.;)
 

CHRIS8

Disabled Account
2001-12-12 8:47 am
VA, USA
cowanrg:

"from a personal prospective, spikes on speakers and subs make all the difference in the world."

This i agree with. But the differences are additonal resonances and floor vibration. This WILL make a difference on resonant floors.

"use suspension spikes, wilson and dynaudio to name a few, but i believe that theirs use hydraulic"

Yes. Not directly coupled to enclosure. If you are correct. I have not paid attention to the specific feet manufacuter's use, never been a priority for me to notice.

Now, if you notice i said that direct coupled spikes DO make a difference. If you prefer additional resonances, and floor vibration, good. BUt a spike does not decouple vs. a rubber foot. That is absurd. It does just the opposite unless their is some decoupling device between teh spike and enclosure, such as the Wilson's use..that you claim.

-Chris
 

MRehorst

Member
2002-05-17 8:48 pm
Spikes can be a real nice addition to a speaker system by biting through carpet and making the speakers more stable so that kids, dogs, and people stumbling around in the dark are less likely to knock the things over. Also, spikes tend to discourage moving the speakers around so when you have found a good position for them, they will stay put.

I think spikes on floor standing speakers can affect the sound a bit, but not in the way most people seem to think.

Spikes have two main effects- they raise the speakers a bit which means the tweeters/midrange drivers will be heard from a slightly different angle (plus the associated effects on reflections within the listening room) quite possibly coloring the sound slightly.

The second effect is also due to raising the bottom of the speaker off the floor- instead of the weight of the speaker and the floor damping vibrations in the bottom panel of the speaker, by lifting it off the floor and supporting it at the corners (where spikes are typically installed) you now have an extra vibrating surface radiating into the room. Depending upon the construction of the speaker, this may or may not be audible.

These effects, like many others minor effects that people pursue with such vigor, that may or may not be audible, do not necessarily "improve" the sound but only change it slightly. Your appreciation of the change (if it actually exists) will vary with your mood and many other factors.

Now since you may or may not hear a real effect of a minor change, and since it may or may not be pleasureable, and since your mood and other factors affect your appreciation of the effect, why pour so much energy into such a minor thing? The one thing that remains the same throughout all your twiddling with a system is the music you're playing. Why not forget all the tweeky stuff and spend some time really listening to and enjoying the music?

Of course, that's just my opinion and opinions are like ... well, you know.

MR
 
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