VINYL will never die !

rdf

Member
2004-06-21 8:04 am
big smoke
Around NYC it was Tower Records.
The Tower on Sunset was an essential stop when visiting family in Cali. Pic pulled from the web but it's how I remember the place.
 

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rdf

Member
2004-06-21 8:04 am
big smoke
Yes I missed a few good artists but not many.
You also missed out on insane resale values. Some recently checked prices on those drugs and booze fueled releases in the collection are three figures. An example, Discogs listings for original pressings of Earth AD by the Misfits:
  • The cheapest :​

    CA$174.21
  • The average price :​

    CA$262.89
  • The most expensive :​

    CA$527.03
 
All those fools (are you one of them?) that chose to toss their records for CD, (I hate that lousy modern term 'vinyl') that now desire to re-replace their records are at the mercy of modern-day offerings.
You bought into the "trendy" digital CD era media, the music industry continued to profit, and you paid.
And now you have to pay again. :headbash:

Stable-minded as I am, I still have my record collections, so I'm way ahead of the ball game.
Me too, and i still buy records now ,and! i still have the very first record i brought when i was 15! (long time ago 😬)
 

Galu

Member
2018-04-17 6:50 pm
In the UK you used the words LPs or sides, no one ever used the word vinyl.

During the Swinging Sixties, the New Musical Express (NME) used the terms 'LP' and 'Album' interchangeably.

The music paper referred to 45rpm records as both 'Singles' and 'Discs'.

I only used "sides" in the context of Side 1 and Side 2 of an LP - while singles had A Sides and B Sides.
 
Two questions to everyone, but especially the native speakers of English:

When I write "gramophone record", do you associate that with 78 RPM shellac records, vinyl microgroove records or both? Does it depend on what part of the planet you are from?

I know a more common term in the USA is phonograph records, which a speaker of Dutch such as myself would immediately associate with wax cylinders.
 

Brinkman

Member
Paid Member
2007-08-17 5:48 pm
Oakland, CA
Used compact discs are very inexpensive at the moment; a bit of a golden age to buy music on that format. As for vinyl, I only really prefer it when the music I’m purchasing was sequenced for and originally released on that format. Each side of a record is a suite of songs and sometimes I come to favor a particular side of a record, something unique to the format. For music released after the widespread adoption of the compact disc, I don’t really see the point of seeking it out on vinyl unless it’s clear that’s what the artist intended. Some albums released on compact disc were truly meant for that sort of uninterrupted length of play and breaking that up for the sake of having it on vinyl seems counterintuitive.
 

kodabmx

Member
Paid Member
2011-10-31 1:00 am
Toronto
Two questions to everyone, but especially the native speakers of English:

When I write "gramophone record", do you associate that with 78 RPM shellac records, vinyl microgroove records or both? Does it depend on what part of the planet you are from?

I know a more common term in the USA is phonograph records, which a speaker of Dutch such as myself would immediately associate with wax cylinders.
When I hear gramophone, I think Victrola. Then I hear phonograph, I think of wax cylinders. When I hear vinyl, I think microgroove.
 
Some of the most enjoyable times I have ever had was going record (and CD) shopping on business trips/vacation. Tower Records in San Fran was a favorite! Dutchies Record Cave and Sam’s in Montreal. Toronto was always Sam’s and A&A and Peter Dunn’s Vinyl Museum. So much more fun than on line shopping.

I was just spinning something from Peter Dunn’s yesterday on my latest acquisition. I got a near mint Kenwood KP-1100 for Christmas.