Upgrade for NE5532

I opened up my very inexpensive dvd player yesterday to try to look for upgrade options. I noticed that the opamp used for the audio output was an NE5532. Could anyone recommend a specific opamp to upgrade to, or is the NE5532 a decent opamp that I shouldn't worry about replacing for now. I noticed someone talking about an OPA2134 as a replacment. Any suggestions would be apprecited.

Thanks

Rob
 
Rob, NE5532 is really a good OPAMP compared to many others. I have a pre-amplifier built using NE5532 with excellent performance outweighing most high end pre-amplifiers.
NE5532 incoporates BJT circuitry inside, but if u wish to go something with FET circuits inside AD825 is the best choice.
Please consult other diy hobbyist, may be they can give u better options.

-XL
 
TI/Burr Brown's OPA2604 is a good alternative as well. It has a strong output stage as well as JFET inputs. Because of (at least) the input stage differences (JFET vs. bipolar in the NE5532) there may some perceivable performance differences. How noticeable these differences are and whether the differences are good or bad depends on your specific application (RIAA equalizer, line driver, tone control, post DAC filter, etc.).

It features low distortion and low noise. It is also more forgiving of less than optimal rail decoupling, unlike some of the video speed devices that folks like to use these days. :)

However, the bottom line is it's safe to drop in and see what you think. So do it and have fun.

Michael
 
the opa2134 are actually cheap and maybe give some sonic differences, but I have read that even high-end brands use the ne5532 ... I am, gonna switch the opamps in my CD player soon with opa2134 (are reaaaaal low budget types) but I would like more to change the cap's to high-end types, their influence non-lineairuty is understandeble and evident, while the opamps only make a difference below noise level... but I could be wrong.. opamp is a nice topic

any comments anyone?

greetings,
Thijs
 
try the analog devices OP275 too - it's not very glamorous but it is a solid device that sounds pretty good in many common applications, and it's pretty cheap too. if you want to go really high performance, AD825 is good, or maybe burr-brown OPA627, but those are single designs - if you need a dual opamp your choices are a bit more limited.

dorkus
 
Rob one thing I've noticed is that replacing the op-amp for a faster one can sometimes not be a good thing. Often it makes the player "glare" and is not really pleasant to listen to, even though it may technically be better. This is one reason I like the 2604 as it doesn't seem to emphasise poor quality electronics behind it as much as many. Mind you op-amps are hardly expensive so you can experiment with a few different types and get an idea of which you may prefer as it will possibly come down to personal preference. All that were recommended are excellent in different ways.

Cheers,

Pete
 
i agree w/pete about using high-speed op-amps, if you are trying to play around w/a relatively inexpensive DVD player which most likely doesn't have such great power supply decoupling, you may not like the results w/a high speed op-amp... something like the OPA2604 or OP275 may work better. you should also see if there's room to stick in an extra couple decoupling caps on the board on the power supply rails as close as possible to the op-amp, in my experience this makes a very worthwhile improvement. i recommend Panasonic HFQ types, which are relatively compact and have good performance.
 
ok, good luck... be careful with randomly changing capacitors though, everyone knows ceramic caps sound pretty bad, but in a high-speed digital environment they can be essential for bypassing RF noise on the supply lines. film-type caps do sound better for analog signal applications, but they are far more inductive at high frequencies and less effective at supressing RFI than a ceramic. usually leaving the 0.1uF and smaller ceramic bypasses around is a good idea, concentrate on upgrading the electrolytics with larger and higher-grade components if space permits.

regards,
marc

p.s. oh, i was referring of course to ceramics on the power supply lines, if there are any in the analog signal path (they are often used as cheap low-pass filters), replace them with a polypropylene/styrene by all means!
 
Good Audio Op Amp

I opened up my very inexpensive dvd player yesterday to try to look for upgrade options. I noticed that the opamp used for the audio output was an NE5532. Could anyone recommend a specific opamp to upgrade to, or is the NE5532 a decent opamp that I shouldn't worry about replacing for now. I noticed someone talking about an OPA2134 as a replacment. Any suggestions would be apprecited.

Thanks

Rob

The ne5532 is a great op amp. The LME49720 is better than the NE5532 in many respects such as the noise figure and distortion. The most important thing to look for when choosing an op amp for audio is making sure it is stable at the gains you intend to use it for e.g. if the gain is going to be x1 then you would need a unity gain stable op amp. If you want to use an op amp that is not stable at the gain you intend to use it for then you would need to add frequency compensation components. Thats my two cents.
 
I don't think that a lot of people over here will agree, but I prefer high slew-rate opamps with a large open-loop bandwidth (> 10Khz), such as the AD826. Why?

- The high slew-rate (350V/us) enables them to cope with very fast signals. Also a good choise for a DAC I/V.
- The slightly higher noise figures (18nV/Hz) do not affect the results too much. Resistors contribute more to noise figures than the opamp.
- The open-loop bandwidth reduces the need for NFB, as well as the distortion figures in the higher audio bandwidth.

Further: the AD826 sounds very good and involving.
 
Ah, handy to know when I use up my current tube.

When I tested a bunch of them in my head amp, I found I could not hear much difference between most of the mentioned. Better than the Signetics, but even that was slight. Execution is more important than the spread between them I believe.
 
The point is -based on experience from upgrading, modding dozens of CD players, preamps, headphone amps etc.- that there is no such thing as "best" opamp. Depending on the "application" environment (gain, PS decoupling, signal level, supply voltage), there are many excellent opamps you can choose from, but you must find the most suitable (best sounding one) by experimenting a lot. The best you can do, install a high quality IC socket, and just swap them. All the previously mentioned ones can excel in the proper environment, even the good old stalwart 5532. (With that one be aware, some brands can sound much better than others -stay away from Texas and JRC...)
 
I don't think that a lot of people over here will agree, but I prefer high slew-rate opamps with a large open-loop bandwidth (> 10Khz), such as the AD826. Why?

- The high slew-rate (350V/us) enables them to cope with very fast signals. Also a good choise for a DAC I/V.
- The slightly higher noise figures (18nV/Hz) do not affect the results too much. Resistors contribute more to noise figures than the opamp.
- The open-loop bandwidth reduces the need for NFB, as well as the distortion figures in the higher audio bandwidth.

Further: the AD826 sounds very good and involving.

Two questions.

1. What do you mean by "very fast signals"?
2. Is the NE5532 (or NE5534) unable to cope with "very fast" audio signals?