Meet "Fritz der Netzverteiler"

jean-paul

diyAudio Moderator Emeritus
2002-09-20 7:20 am
Germany
Moin! :) Btw. a little fact about the word/phrase "moin" which even most germans do not know. In german "moin" sounds pretty similar to "morgen" which is short for "guten morgen" > "good morning". Despite the somehow similar pronounciation does the term "moin" not relate to a specific time of the day, as it is short for the phrase "moien (or mojen) dag" which means "have a nice day". So "moi (moj) is northern german accent for "nice". :)

Hi! I worked with a lot of fun for a company in Neumünster for a while. There "Moin" is fully normal so I adapted. Never understood 100% what the meaning was, only that it was used as Guten Morgen but also later on the day which made me wonder. I regularly hear in in the Ruhrpott as well. It is similar to dutch with "mooi".

Thanks for the explanation. I learn new words everyday in Germany of which the slang words are the best. Some highlights are IMO "rucki zucki" and "schnick schnack" :D
 
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Thanks for the explanation. I learn new words everyday in Germany of which the slang words are the best. Some highlights are IMO "rucki zucki" and "schnick schnack" :D


So, if you collect strange sounding, or almost forgotten german expressions, I could offer you "Potzblitz!" It's an expression for amazement, like "oh wow!".
Another nice one is "Tohuwabohu", which means a big mess.
 

jean-paul

diyAudio Moderator Emeritus
2002-09-20 7:20 am
Germany
The latter is a new one to me but Tohuwabohu is originally hebrew (תהו ובהו tōhū wā-bōhū), just looked it up. I think the language is so difficult that people use abbreviations and slang by habit. Like “Azubi” (Auszubildende) and “Kita” (Kindertagesstätte) show. For foreigners these abbreviations are extra difficult as one can not make up the original words just like that when hearing them. It should then become clear by the context.

The almost forgotten words and even archaic use of language differ throughout the country. What is hip in NRW may be old fashioned in another part of the country and vice versa.

Just got back from the backery with “Frischkäsechillipeperonistange" (bread with cottage cheese, chili and pepperoni). I can not make up such a word :)
 
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Thai Basilicum with Chicken and Eggs.

My wife, Thai, she cooked this for me a minute ago..
It's called Thai Basilicum With Chicken Eggs, Beans and Rice, Real Spicey..
In Thai Pad Gra Pao ผัดกระเพรา

Easy to cook...
You can find the recipe on the Internet I think
I do not cook I just keep Restaurant running.. Administering and everything else besides NOT COOKING
Leave the cooking to those who cook good, and the Restaurant has always guests..
 

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So, if you collect strange sounding, or almost forgotten german expressions, I could offer you "Potzblitz!" It's an expression for amazement, like "oh wow!".
Another nice one is "Tohuwabohu", which means a big mess.
"Potzblitz" resembles "Ei der Daus". Another one for your collection may be "Pillepalle". If you like that argot you may have a look at W.Busch.
 

jean-paul

diyAudio Moderator Emeritus
2002-09-20 7:20 am
Germany
Jaaa! "Pillepalle" is a nice one. I already knew it. Well, it is not a question of liking (but I do like it) but merely a necessity as otherwise language becomes a burden. Imagine working in Germany as a foreigner and then have to cope with everyday spoken language and the official version one learns in school.
 
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jean-paul

diyAudio Moderator Emeritus
2002-09-20 7:20 am
Germany
In fact it was a very good experience. Tiring what language concerns but apart from that I enjoyed it. Strict and clear. Good experiences with "Handwerker" or manual laborers. Most of those are competent and knowledgable in what they do. Fachleute.
 
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