How to Make Small Cube Speakers

Okay, thinking about making my own cube style speakers, just like some name brand out there. I really like the size, and it's not an eyesore as compared to even some of the smallest surround enclosures out there on my walls. I found some 2" full range speakers on
TangBand
I'm not sure which model would work best, but the list a few. Here are the item numbers:
W2-803SB
W2-800SB
W2-802SA
W2-748SD
Does anyone know the thickness of the wood or whatever material I would have to use to make a really small cube speaker? I hope someone can give me some measurements and specs on building a cube. Maybe about the size of 3"x3"x3" or so. Not much bigger than that. This would be a really good project to work on and I would be extremely proud if I could make it myself, and make it better than other brands.

If anyone else knows of where I can get really small full-range drivers like this, please post or email me. Thanks everyone!
 
Xyberz said:
Okay, thinking about making my own cube style speakers, just like some name brand out there. I really like the size, and it's not an eyesore as compared to even some of the smallest surround enclosures out there on my walls. I found some 2" full range speakers on
TangBand
I'm not sure which model would work best, but the list a few. Here are the item numbers:
W2-803SB
W2-800SB
W2-802SA
W2-748SD
Does anyone know the thickness of the wood or whatever material I would have to use to make a really small cube speaker? I hope someone can give me some measurements and specs on building a cube. Maybe about the size of 3"x3"x3" or so. Not much bigger than that. This would be a really good project to work on and I would be extremely proud if I could make it myself, and make it better than other brands.

If anyone else knows of where I can get really small full-range drivers like this, please post or email me. Thanks everyone!

Forgot to mention, also on a TIGHT budget. Sorry bout that.
 
Xyberz said:
I've found some 2.5 speakers from a Taiwan company. Check out the site and let me know if they're better than the Tang Bands.

You want to stick with a distributor that is on the same continent... which one are you on?

What would you say would be the best type of material to build a enclosure for the cube speakers? Wood or clay as you listed? Or would some type of metal box be really good also

What are you comfortable working with? Wood, clay, aluminum, PVC pipe can all be used to make good cabinets. I suspect that appropriate use of epoxy & paper could make a pretty good cabinet too. Cardboard is often used for quick & nasty, i want to get an idea of how it sounds. Shaped & treated it might be useable as a finished cabinet. You just have to use your imagination -- i saw a set of 3" TBs someone mounted in some colorful plastic kid's lunchboxes.

dave
 
Well I'm in Hawaii in the United States. Just shopping around for really good prices, doesn't really matter to me where it comes from, but the price does.

As for the enclosure, thanks for the different type of materials. Another question I have now is how do I know what size it has to be? I really don't understand all the technical specs on speakers and wouldn't have a clue to what to build. If I build it out of aluminum, would you happen to know what thickness I should get and how to make the sucker? I like metal, but I'm not sure if it sounds better than wood. If it's too much of a hassle then I'll just stick to 1/2"MDF.
 
Xyberz said:
Well I'm in Hawaii in the United States. Just shopping around for really good prices, doesn't really matter to me where it comes from, but the price does.

I'd still go with the TBs. And postage out of Canada (Nuera) to Hawaii might be cheaper than from mainland US.

As for the enclosure, thanks for the different type of materials. Another question I have now is how do I know what size it has to be?

I just plug the numbers into a box calculator (MacSpeakerz) and play with it until i'm happy. If we could attract kelticwizard he's got things down to where he can look at the numbers and tell what will work best.

I really don't understand all the technical specs on speakers and wouldn't have a clue to what to build. If I build it out of aluminum, would you happen to know what thickness I should get and how to make the sucker? I like metal, but I'm not sure if it sounds better than wood. If it's too much of a hassle then I'll just stick to 1/2"MDF.

If you can't tell me how to build a box out of AL you probably don't want to try -- requires welding. Voidfree plywood is a better bet than MDF IMO.

dave
 
Bose Jewel Cube Speakers

Can someone please help me? I have a question regarding the Bose Jewel Cubes.
[IMGHTTPDEAD]http://www.bose.com/images_global/td_j_cube.jpg[/IMGHTTPDEAD]
As you can see from the pic above, the cubes are not empty but have a nautilus style chamber inside. The measurements of the cubes are:
4 1/2"H x 2 1/4"W x 3 1/4"D (11.2 x 5.6 x 8.1 cm)
I was wondering how much that affects the sound. I'm guessing that the speaker is probably a 2" full-range driver.
If I were to build a enclosure of the exact same dimensions, and with a 2" driver, would it sound the same? Does anyone also know how to make a chamber like that inside such a small enclosure? I'm looking to get better drivers than the one in the Bose Jewel Cubes, and was hoping that I could get louder and better sound. Please don't write just to bag on Bose, I really could care less about the company, I just want something REALLY small and nice looking. Big speakers are not something my wife is really going to appreciate, if you guys out there know what I mean.
Also does anyone have any technical specs on the cubes, along with maybe more detailed design features?
:confused:
 
"I was wondering how much that affects the sound. I'm guessing that the speaker is probably a 2" full-range driver"

Well, as with any enclosure, it affects it a lot. The jewel cube driver is about 2 inches but it is not "full-range". It is designed to be crossed over rather high at about 180 hz.

The Jewel cube is ported by the use of that spiral you see in there, what bose calls the "Nautalus Port". There is no easy way to duplicate complicated plastic molding like this for the DIY'er. Let alone designing and tuning an essentially miniscule ported enclosure. From scratch no less.

Making something "better" is not a simple matter of getting the same size driver and making a box with the same outside dimensions.

There are many good books on the subject of speaker building.
Although this forum can save you some time, a good basic understanding of the science behind speaker building is what you should invest in first.

I hope I'm not discouraging you too much. I just hate to see someone disapoint themselves:( for lack of a good starting point.
Good luck.
 
Wow. I wish I had the time and patience to learn all about speakers and building enclosures. Unfortunately at this moment, I don't have that much time to commit to something like that. That's why I was hoping I could come here and ask for help from experienced people. So what would you suggest? Would just a speaker in a small enclosure be good enough or should I keep asking for some more help? Thanks for the reply
 
There is as much marketing as there is science in those enclosures.

dave

(in my moderator role - Xyberz - you keep starting new threads on what is really the same topic, constructing your compact 5.1 system. I am going to merge this thread with that one. If you keep in that thread everyone can see where you are coming from and therefore provide better help)
 
TagBand -- quick box calc

Sealed boxs

W2-803SB 2" -- you almost can't build a box that will actually fit the driver and be too small. something like a 9 or 10 cm (inside) cube would do. get down to about 250 Hz.

W3-593S 3" -- something like a 15 cm cube will get you down close to 100Hz for much better integration with a sub.

Note: as long as the volume remains about the same and you can actually fit the driver in the box any shape is OK (ignoring even multiple resonances and such).

tagbandFR.gif


dave
 
Does anyone know of any better 2" - 3" full range speakers? I'm looking for the highest wattage I can find. The one W2-803SB are only rated at 10W RMS and 20W Peak. I was hoping maybe 30W RMS 60-100W Peak or something close to that. I've been searching online and haven't really found any other companies yet.

Also does anyone know of the wattage rating for the Bose Jewel Cubes? I think I've seen them range between 10-100W.
 
Xyberz said:
Does anyone know of any better 2" - 3" full range speakers? I'm looking for the highest wattage I can find. The one W2-803SB are only rated at 10W RMS and 20W Peak. I was hoping maybe 30W RMS 60-100W Peak or something close to that. I've been searching online and haven't really found any other companies yet.

Also does anyone know of the wattage rating for the Bose Jewel Cubes? I think I've seen them range between 10-100W.

These are probably the best bang for the buck you are going to find -- your budget restictions will severly limit your choices. The power ratings are actually quite high. The 4" i use in my system are rated at 3W. I expect if rated on the same scale the Bose are 5W.

One has to remember that speaker power ratings are one of the least understood and most useless specs bandied about. Ideally you have more power than the speaker needs because it is the amp clipping that tend to let the smoke out of speakers.

dave
 
One has to remember that speaker power ratings are one of the least understood and most useless specs bandied about. Ideally you have more power than the speaker needs because it is the amp clipping that tend to let the smoke out of speakers.

I'm not sure what that means. How would the amp clip the speakers? Sorry, new to the whole HT audio scene. Also what do you mean power rating being one of the least understood and useless specs? Isn't usually the more the better? That's what my understanding of it was. I didn't realilze that the Bose speakers would be only about 5W, but how does it sound so loud? I figure 5 watts is nothing compared to a 100W sub. I see some bookshelf speakers have incredible ear piercing 100-200W! So how could this be? Sorry, just boggling my mind at the moment.
 
Xyberz said:
I'm not sure what that means. How would the amp clip the speakers? Sorry, new to the whole HT audio scene. Also what do you mean power rating being one of the least understood and useless specs? Isn't usually the more the better? That's what my understanding of it was. I didn't realilze that the Bose speakers would be only about 5W, but how does it sound so loud? I figure 5 watts is nothing compared to a 100W sub. I see some bookshelf speakers have incredible ear piercing 100-200W! So how could this be? Sorry, just boggling my mind at the moment.

Alot of time, marketers take advantage of the typical mal bigger is better attitude to their advantage.

1st 100W is 13 dB more than 5W. (100 W is only 3dB more than 50W).

Also keep in mind that amplifier specs can be misleading as well since the rating is into a resistor (and a speaker does not often resemble a resistor). ie a 20W amp can play louder before clipping than a 200W amp. And keep in mind that HT receivers are one place where they generally play the numbers game to the max (ie if your budget HT Receiver is rated at 50W/channel, a well built 10W amp probably sounds way more powerful.

If we assume that the average SPL levels are 20dB down from the peaks (reasonable on average) that means when your 100W amp is clipping the average power levels are 1W. Most of the time, unless you have horrendously inefficient speakers, you are using on average mere milliwatts of power.

So you can see that in most cases your amp is clipping long before your speaker's power ratings are exceeded, even if that rating is only 5-10W.

dave