Danish oil plus a clear?

SS4927

Member
2013-12-08 3:15 pm
I tested this Danish oil and quite like the looks of it. Now I have two questions,

For (possibly) better results would you advise using some type of pore opener prior to applying Danish oil, or would it not be recommended?

And, How about an oil based clear over the oil after it has time to set up? With or without the furniture I seen had a stunning finish. I think I remember the fella mentioning that it also had some satin clear over the Danish oil. What are your thoughts?

Finish pictures existing of Danish oils would be great, too :D
 
I'd leave the pores as they are; as for finish clear coat over the fully cured oil finish, while I personally like the speed of application of sprayed NC lacquer (not water based urethanes), in keeping with the oil finish, how about finishing paste wax. I've used both a Watco product -Satin Wax, and Minwax brand paste wax. The former is as easy to apply as the oil finish itself, and whenever possible, I like to use product from the same manufacturer to ensure chemical compatibility.

Of course, all oil/ wax finishes eventually need maintenance - the lacquer doesn't, unless damaged by the usual culprits
 
Depends on the material. hard woods it works fine as is. Then I buff it with a good bee's wax. Straight onto a Birch pine etc, I wouldn't know never tried it (yet) but a good 50/50 shellac perhaps would stop the blotches.
The only thing I 've tried on Birch ply is Chestnut acrylic sanding sealer followed by Chestnut Acrylic Lacquer - no pics sorry.. it simply looks like its been varnished without turning yellow..
 
I would use paste wax after the Danish oil. If you want to build up a surface layer I have had good results with waterlox. https://www.waterlox.com/
Thin it with mineral spirits and wipe on thin coats. it can build up to a very nice shine. Also very durable.

Be careful with any of these oil finishes..... Rags can and will self combust.
 
This is Danish oil on European Walnut Heart without a polishing I guess a veneer would look similar.

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SS4927

Member
2013-12-08 3:15 pm
What type of wood are you planing to finish.
Melting some bees wax into linseed or tung oil to create a cream consistent to soft butter can be used in the final polish.

A few are exotics and have beautiful looking colour and grain. Plus a few north american species, maple, cherry, and a couple different oak, I might of left out a couple.

Anyhow after getting some of it ripped down and witnessing the colours in its natural raw state I might not want to tangle with it much in way of staining, question mark. Then some of it like the rich grain oak, takes to colour stains exceptionally and shows well. It will be multi coloured, wich I like. Maybe Ill stain some boards while just clearing others.

I tried to capture what Im talking about will set a trial picture once upload finishes. Although the lighting is p*$$ poor Ill give it a try.
 

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SS4927

Member
2013-12-08 3:15 pm
Edit time expired, oops.

Some arent included in pictures I have enough cut to get started.

As you can see I burned a couple 1/8 pieces, oops again. Its not badly burned nothing the sanding phase shouldnt take care of.

Fivetide I really like the carving, very nice proudly hang that one up for display.
 

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SS4927

Member
2013-12-08 3:15 pm
Im thinking now, of different product that leaves it mostly natural looking yet highlights whats already there but doesnt take away from it "natural" look.

I think I will stain some and leave some light actuallu, for the contrasting effect. But I could use some more help there, what type of products are best for this?
 
Not sure how you plan on staining select strips in a glued up lamination,you will likely have stain bleeding into the next strip.
I glued up a cutting board one time with maple and paduak which is red in color, the sanding dust from the paduak inbedded it self into the pores of the maple, that,s when i learned the value of the card scraper to scrap the entire surface.
As far as finishes go varnish and lacquer finishes tend to be more protective and durable but repairs are a bitc........ usually end up in stripping and refinishing, not to mention the look of a plastic film over your wood. Shellacs and oil finishes are less protective less durable but much easier to repair. They also give the wood a more natural look and feel,and have been used for hundreds of years.
I guess if you need to finish a wood floor or a veneered tabletop laq or varnish is the way to go, but is your audio gear gonna need that much protection?
Just my two loonies worth
Each to there own i guess.
 

SS4927

Member
2013-12-08 3:15 pm
Not sure how you plan on staining select strips in a glued up lamination,you will likely have stain bleeding into the next strip.
I glued up a cutting board one time with maple and paduak which is red in color, the sanding dust from the paduak inbedded it self into the pores of the maple, that,s when i learned the value of the card scraper to scrap the entire surface.
As far as finishes go varnish and lacquer finishes tend to be more protective and durable but repairs are a bitc........ usually end up in stripping and refinishing, not to mention the look of a plastic film over your wood. Shellacs and oil finishes are less protective less durable but much easier to repair. They also give the wood a more natural look and feel,and have been used for hundreds of years.
I guess if you need to finish a wood floor or a veneered tabletop laq or varnish is the way to go, but is your audio gear gonna need that much protection?
Just my two loonies worth
Each to there own i guess.

I used a water based stain and shellac combination in the past with pretty good results. Its nice but not as nice as some of the danish oil finishes. I have some time to think about it some more. I know about the bleeding over. I tried the same water stain in cherry on one strip before gluing it down. I cant remember if it was before or after I took the picture. I wanted to see how the colour would work with the ones left naturals.

Whats this darker wood species (shown separately)?
 

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SS4927

Member
2013-12-08 3:15 pm
The birch ply lines up so well, I was considering using some after gluing veneer on cut sides of a piece, maybe not this time. next to it is the cherry stain, it has a brilliant tone to it, it looks good especially after its cleared. Even though this wont see any traffic I think Ill use oils.
 

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not a finish expert, but

I've used Watco/Danish/Maloof on a few projects now, and really like it.
I usually let the price dry thoroughly (4-7 days), then finish with a couple of coats of wipe-on oil poly.

For a recent project, I added some oil-based red stain to the Watco, and it worked beautifully. BTW, I tried some Watco on plain oak, and it really made the grain pop.

Here is a set of Quarks with cherry veneer. The oil made it look a bit more brown than usual, and the pic is not great, but I like the result.
 

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odorless

joe - nice job on those little Quarks - contact cement or iron on glue method?

I must use odorless at my house, so no contact cement.
After fooling around with other glue methods, I've settled on Heatlock glue and iron on. I used that for the first time on this build, and was really impressed with the hold, especially on corners and edges. :)
 

SS4927

Member
2013-12-08 3:15 pm
I concur nice job on those joe, very. Hey joe when you mentioned using the watco on the plain oak what shade was in the tin originally? I think you meant on another occasion and not having tinted it my right?

As you can see a good percentage of this defuse'ing panel has oak in it.


I'm happy with how its coming along. I probably could of got close to the end of the assembly stage this afternoon if it hadnt been for a jerk off passing my blade through 1/2" acrylic. It even had trouble with baltic birch ply so I hung it up :mad:. Ive been on a tool rant all afternoon lol. Rightfully so though. Although it isn't funny really.
 

SS4927

Member
2013-12-08 3:15 pm
Maybe I will take the more scenic route and pull out the masking tape opposed to a once shot colour deal. I'd really like each wood to show its different character. I mean its a defuser it could probably use all the help it can get. The prettier/more interesting it is to look at the better. Especially if I hang it in a more decorative setting the higher potential wife acceptance factor could pay off. Not that I would mind it either.
 
I concur nice job on those joe, very. Hey joe when you mentioned using the watco on the plain oak what shade was in the tin originally? I think you meant on another occasion and not having tinted it my right?

As you can see a good percentage of this defuse'ing panel has oak in it.

.

Sorry, couldn't see the pic in your post.

Here's a scrap of red oak bare, and with 1 quick wipe of maloof.
I'm def going to use this the next oak project I do.
 

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