3-way speaker to 8 ohm crossover to 2 ohm amp?

Makonga

Member
2020-01-22 1:29 am
Good day, community.
At first place i would like to apologise if there is a similar thread, but search button doesn't work for me. After googling a whole day, im not quite sure if i understood ir right. I hope that anyone could help me.

I would like to make a 3-way speaker with all 3 drivers being 8 ohm individual.

I have not best but decent amp from my car setup. 2x150w [email protected] ohms or 2x75w [email protected] ohms.

If i would connect my desired drivers in parallel direct to amp it would require 2.66 ohms amplifier. In this scenario ohm ratio is tolerate.

If i connect all 3 drivers to 3-way crossover designed for 8 ohm drivers will it require 8 ohm amp output or 2 ohm amp is just fine?

8 ohm lows + 8 ohms mids + 8 ohms highs + 8 ohms XO = ???

P. S. I dont seek to burn my house or amp :)
 

rayma

Member
2011-04-29 8:37 pm
When you use a passive crossover inside the speaker, the amplifier sees 8 ohms at the frequencies
in each driver's range, but much higher ohms outside that range. Then the three ranges combine
in parallel to provide 8 ohms in the entire speaker's range. So you'll have an 8 ohm speaker system.
 

Makonga

Member
2020-01-22 1:29 am
When you use a passive crossover inside the speaker, the amplifier sees 8 ohms at the frequencies
in each driver's range, but much higher ohms outside that range. Then the three ranges combine
in parallel to provide 8 ohms in the entire speaker's range. So you'll have an 8 ohm speaker system.

Thank you for answer! Just to make sure i understood it correct. If i would connect 2 x 8 ohms crossovers in parallel on one channel would it make a total of 4 ohms load?
 
:confused: Probably I don't read carefully...probably the title drove me nuts! As there's no 2Ω amp or whatsoever. But, yes, you can parallel 2*8Ω crossovers ( whatever that means) and make it Z=4Ω.
Bearing in mind that those numbers are ...uhm...er,,,( I'm losing the memory)
Symbolic or, they do represent a Segment, well something starting with the letter S :p
 

Makonga

Member
2020-01-22 1:29 am
:confused: Probably I don't read carefully...probably the title drove me nuts! As there's no 2Ω amp or whatsoever. But, yes, you can parallel 2*8Ω crossovers ( whatever that means) and make it Z=4Ω.
Bearing in mind that those numbers are ...uhm...er,,,( I'm losing the memory)
Symbolic or, they do represent a Segment, well something starting with the letter S :p

Well my amp is realy 300W x 2-Ch @ 2-Ohms. :confused:

HTML:
http://www.caraudio4less.co.uk/crunch-gp2150-2-channel-ground-power-amplifier-p-1959.html

Any thoughts about this setup below? :confused:
 

Attachments

  • 2x3way.png
    2x3way.png
    72.6 KB · Views: 101
I have no idea - yes, the halving of output is theoretically right, going with double Z load.
You have to chose the specific drivers - woofer, midrange- tweeter and make a crossover tailored to them. Or find a specific design with drivers and crossovers already tested. Nothing particular difficult ( the latter )
 

AllenB

Moderator
Paid Member
2008-10-18 11:31 am
A 4 ohm crossover does not make the speaker 4 ohms. Instead it is called a 4 ohm crossover because it is designed to adjust frequencies better with 4 ohm drivers, that is all.
Doesnt 2 x4ohm XO makes bass and treble also 2 ohms?
At each of bass and treble frequencies you have one driver, the tweeter is 4 ohms and the woofer is 4 ohms. At midrange frerquencies you have 2 drivers, both 4 ohms=2 ohms total.

You have this for left and again for right. Dont add them together, you use a separate amp for each side so work them out by themselves.