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Old 2nd April 2003, 02:53 AM   #1
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Default The way to built a chassiss

Let's get physical and start building something.

This is the way I like to built my chassiss. I usually don't buy materials for that from metal suppliers, but like to look at surplus stores for loose panels taken from some other electrical equipment. Anything that is 1/8 or prefferably thicker can be put into a good use when building a chassiss. Those panels are usually nicely painted and the finish is industrial strong.

I start a chassiss from choosing feet, since this is the most important thing here. After seeing Boulder equipment, I'm not using round feet anymore, and acrylic makes a nice material choice not only from a soundwise POV, but it's also easy to cut, looks nice when sanded and is cheap. I add damping sheets at the bottom and place the feet at the very corners.
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Old 2nd April 2003, 03:01 AM   #2
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We got the 3/16" bottom panel cut to the size, so the next step is adding the sides. I like to use flatbars 3/8 or 1/2" thick and usually 2.5 or 3" wide. One reason for that is that I don'thave to use any additional rods or angles to attach all the other panels; I simply drill and tap the holes in the side panels. Since the bottom is pretty thick, I use Allen type screws and bore the holes so the heads are recessed and don't stick out so much. Size #6 or #8 is a good choice here.
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File Type: jpg sideon.jpg (38.1 KB, 4311 views)
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Old 2nd April 2003, 03:06 AM   #3
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Here's the look of a rear panel. It is attached to the back edge of side panels. Additionaly, the 5/8" bar is added in a center to make connection to the top and bottom covers. Six screws, size 4, are used altogether. Both rear and front panels are anodized and I'm using here some surplus, in good shape, material.
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File Type: jpg back.jpg (35.2 KB, 4206 views)
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Old 2nd April 2003, 03:07 AM   #4
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Here's the pic when back is on
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Old 2nd April 2003, 03:15 AM   #5
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The front panel is pretty tricky to make, especially when no pots and swithes are used. I build it from two pieces. One is the outside, visible panel, the other is a subplate which is used to mount it to the rest of a chassiss as well as support top from bending. You probably noticed that top panel will go really on top and it rests on side panels, rear panel and front subplate. I think it is a better way to do it and it provides support in case you want to place something on top of your unit (Shakti stones maybe or some weights?).
I'm using angles to attach the front assembly to the sides, with a screws which mount from the inside. I glue both panels with 5min epoxy and this gives me the final one piece panel. This particular one has two LEDs in front and I used those holes for easy aignment. In case you are using pots and swithches no glue is required and you can use the hardware to keep both parts together.
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File Type: jpg front.jpg (33.8 KB, 4081 views)
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Old 2nd April 2003, 03:16 AM   #6
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Here's a detail for corner assembly.
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File Type: jpg frontcorner.jpg (32.1 KB, 3347 views)
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Old 2nd April 2003, 03:18 AM   #7
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And this is a view of the whole thing, except for the top.
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Old 2nd April 2003, 03:21 AM   #8
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Here's the detail of rear corner. I'm using nice screws, which are not regular Philips but are torx and this provides for better (more hi tech) look.
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File Type: jpg rearcorner.jpg (44.3 KB, 3241 views)
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Old 2nd April 2003, 03:25 AM   #9
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This could actually make the chassiss complete, yet for me it seems a bit unfinished like that, too much cold looking without definition. What I'm doing to improve on that is adding additional side panels. I have found this really nice surplus place and for last 10 years they had those cut off pieces of some fiber materal. It looks better than wood and is much stronger and doesn't require finishing after cutting. This is what I'm using here. I think it looks better that way
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File Type: jpg complete.jpg (54.7 KB, 3283 views)
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“Do something really well. See how much time it takes. It might be a product, a work of art, who knows? Then give it away cheaply, just because you feel that it should not cost so much, even if it took a lot of time and expensive materials to make it.” - JC
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Old 2nd April 2003, 03:32 AM   #10
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This is again front corner detail after adding side panels.

And this is complete chassiss, this one is for a DAC and took me 3 evenings to make. What I liked about it, is that I was using prefinished panels and except for 3/8" aluminum sides, didn't have to finish anything.
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