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AT-HA5000

Posted 21st May 2015 at 01:32 PM by rjm
Updated Yesterday at 12:00 AM by rjm

This post, about a push-pull MOSFET output stage for a headphone amp, got me thinking again about the Audio Technica AT-HA5000, which is something of a benchmark in its class. The "basic" signal circuit (not a complete schematic, it's clearly missing some ancillary details) is attached below. Probably out of MJ originally.

I think with any circuit like this, the differences are less about the MOSFETs and the operating points and more about the front end and what tricks you do with the power supply. That, and how you make sure it doesn't go up in a puff of vaporized silicon taking your headphones with it.

The Audio Technica schematic has nice old-school Zener regulators, a discrete JFET front end, a long tailed pair + current mirror for voltage gain and "proper" BJT Vbe multiplier and driver stage. Q7 is presumably in thermal contact with Q10,11 providing overtemp protection, and the output has a protection relay (not shown in detail) for overcurrent...
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Old

Szekeres 2015

Posted 20th May 2015 at 06:00 AM by rjm
Updated Yesterday at 12:02 AM by rjm

The circuit was originally hosted on Headwize, but the site seems to have gone offline.

It was a single stage resistively-loaded MOSFET follower, a unity gain current buffer used to drive headphones.

If I was going to built it today, I would build it as the attached schematic. It's little changed really, just an active current source replacing the source resistor. It runs about 2 watts per channel. Distortion figures aren't great, but the operating point is reasonably optimized for 16-300 ohm loads. The transistor parts are just placeholders for the simulation. In practice you'd use something like BD135.

Mostly though the LTSpice sim is just to serve as a reminder of how poor this circuit topology is, and how well it was designed originally. Even on a "best effort" basis there's little more to eke out from it than was already in the original.
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Old

JLH-2005 headphone amplifier

Posted 18th May 2015 at 08:15 AM by rjm
Updated 20th May 2015 at 12:25 AM by rjm

I was perusing this thread earlier today. Which led me to what I think is the original source, at least as a modern, relatively clean headphone amp version of the original original (by way of ESP).

Some comments from our own Nelson Pass are seemingly relevant.

The rough sim, below (LTSpice .zip attached), shows that the circuit performs well enough. The linearity of the circuit is commendable, but the bias currents and DC offset stability (before the coupling cap, which I added to the sim - the original JLH-2005 circuit is DC coupled!) are most definitely not.

In my humble opinion single-ended output stages should be AC (transformer or capacitor) coupled and the biasing circuit should be designed to have reasonable operating point stability.

AC coupled, and simplified to a single supply voltage, the circuit is of interest primarily for its ability to run at very low voltages - 5V operation is perfectly possible. See attached "Bonus"....
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Old

Why do I need a preamp?

Posted 14th May 2015 at 07:22 AM by cspirou

One of the things that confused me a bit when I started this hobby was the distinction between a preamp and an amp. Looking up info on a preamp usually was met with a definition that a preamp controls volume and switches inputs, which never made sense to me because my amp always had volume control and multiple inputs.

Well it turns out that what I (and most people) considered an amp was actually an integrated amp. It never really made that much sense to me to separate the functions in a separate chassis and I would roll my eyes seeing preamps worth at least as much as the price of a good amp. Discussions about the different sound of a preamp are a bit weird for me too. While I don't doubt that different preamps sound different, it seems like people are just separating components to do some mix and matching.

However after being in this hobby for a bit of time I have discovered some solid reasons to have a separate preamp(besides wanting to separate everything)...
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Old

Success!

Posted 12th May 2015 at 04:08 AM by Mike94531
Updated 12th May 2015 at 04:12 AM by Mike94531

Finally finished these up....I attempted to paint them with a hammer finish spray paint..boy did they turn out bad!

So I found a roll of carpet at Lowes and bought a couple cans of spray adhesive.

The speakers sound pretty good..we'll see how they sound when I get around to building my Pass F5 amplifier...so far I only have the boards I bought from the store...expect a few months for sure at the rate I get things done!

Yes, that is real carpet...$20 for the roll..I know I won't win any beauty contests with them but for garage speakers I think they are pretty nice, I also saved some money by using left over wooden hanger rods for the center section supports!

Not sure what kind of grills I am going to put on them for protection out here in the garage, I might have to print something out when I get my 3D printer in a few weeks.

I also included a snapshot of the tool path my CNC Bridgeport used to cut the holes in the front...
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Old

Standard Resistor Values for RJM Audio Projects

Posted 11th May 2015 at 09:15 AM by rjm
Updated 14th May 2015 at 10:40 PM by rjm

From now on every effort will be made to consolidate to the following values, 1/4W metal film:

1, 4.75, 10, 47.5, 100, 150, 221, 475, 1000, 1500, 2210, 4750, 10000, 22100, 47500, and 100000.

Also, the 1/4W 47 ohm and 68k carbon comp. resistor is widely used as damping and bleeder functions, respectively.

Exceptions will be made for the RIAA eq. of the Phonoclone and VSPS circuits, and the business end of the X-reg, where specific, non-standard resistance values are required.

*****

On resistor selection-

I honestly don't know if one resistor sounds better than another. I do know, however, that one resistor can be more expensive than another. At Mouser your basic 1/4W metal film resistor can run between 5 cents and 2 dollars in 100 unit quantities. Setting aside sound quality, it's not at all clear that you are getting any kind of material benefit at all by getting the expensive parts. Instead, it really...
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Old

Commentary on the TDK Life on Record A33 Wireless Weatherproof Speaker

Posted 10th May 2015 at 03:23 AM by rjm
Updated 11th May 2015 at 04:58 AM by rjm

There is something freakish about a brick-sized block that sits there and plays room-filling music ... with no wires attached whatsoever and no obvious moving parts. It gave me the same "I'm living in the future!" sense of wonder I got buying my first 1 TB hard drive.

It doesn't take too much searching the internet to discover that among wireless portable (bluetooth) speakers, the TDK A33 is highly recommended for its exceptionally good sound quality. That comes with a massive caveat, however: Most of the people writing these reviews only have Bose, Beats, and the internal speaker of their iPhone as references for comparison.

So does the A33 sound good in a hifi context?

Read on to find out...

No, okay don't bother. The answer is "no".

But it doesn't sound bad. I'm listening to it now as I type this, hooked up via the AUX input to my Onkyo PCI-200SE sound card, with the A33 tucked under the...
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Old

A headphone amplifier gain calculator

Posted 2nd May 2015 at 05:30 AM by rjm
Updated 2nd May 2015 at 05:33 AM by rjm

You input the headphone sensitivity and impedance, and it spits out what I think is the ideal amplifier gain.

Even if you disagree (personal preference, difference input levels, etc.), the difference will be consistent regardless of headphone as long as the specified parameters are correct.

The gain value setting is tailored to normal line level input and listening fairly loud with the volume control at 9~10 o'clock. The output series resistance is assumed to be zero ohms.

Adjust as desired, and note that 3~6 dB either way will still be a usable. If your amp has a large output series resistance the gain Av should be scaled up as,

(Routput + headphone Z)/(headphone Z)
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Old

Building a vacuum tube amp vs a solid state amp

Posted 22nd April 2015 at 11:35 AM by cspirou

This is my article about comparing vacuum tube amps vs SS amps. There are more than enough places that compare there two types from the aspect of sound. I will avoid that and only concentrate on the differences from a DIY aspect.

Solid state amp pros

*Transistors are cheaper than vacuum tubes
*PCBs are available for many amps
*Transistors are usually more reliable and last longer
*power supplies use lower voltages than tube supplies and therefore are much safer. also no need for a separate heater supply
*usually don't need output transformers
*chassis work is typically limited to front and rear panel

Solid state amp cons

*Often necessary to buy a large heatsink
*If no PCB is available, designing and making your own PCB can be cumbersome
*If you don't use a PCB, point-to-point wiring is very difficult
*Need to be careful with electrostatic discharge. Easy to fry a transistor if you aren't...
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Old

Exploring laptop sound

Posted 16th April 2015 at 11:38 PM by fas42
Updated 27th April 2015 at 05:08 AM by fas42

As mentioned elsewhere, now have a laptop with reasonable internal sound, a HP Compaq 6830S (not a Pavillion, sorry!) of quite some vintage. My mainstay Dell over many years prior lost its sound many years ago, a USB port got cooked, and took down the sound circuitry at the same time; and what I was using as an interim, another Dell of nominally very good quality, had downright faulty sound, buzzed and rattled - was plain sick ...

OK, so the exercise here will be to see how good I can get the newly "installed" HP unit's sound to be, by my measures, using minimal or zero internal hardware tweaking - essentially working out what factors impact the sound, and whether the negatives can be circumvented. This gives an idea of how I go about things, what I use to "measure" with, what I'm listening for.

Trying a couple of CDs that I use often the signs were good - obviously no bass, and the volume is very restricted, but otherwise the sound was 'correct'...
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