What to look for in a multimeter

specialx

Disabled Account
2002-09-19 1:08 am
I am goign to need a good multimeter soon and would like to know what to look for. My application for it would be building, and later designing amplifiers.

So what things should I be looking for? How much DC and AC voltage and amperage should a multimeter be able to handle for this application?
What resistances should it be able to handle up to? And how accurate? Obviously the higher is better but how much tolerance is moderately acceptable?

What about capacitance checks? Worthwhile having? I noticed most of them only go up to uF range anyway.
Diode & Transistor checks? Any of them useful and/or used often by anyone?

I found one also that has temperature check. That seems good for measuring the heat of a heatsink roughly.

Relative zero function? Would that be worthwhile aswell?

Any help would be good. I will also post this to the Wiki, or if someone else wants to, could you direct me there.

Thanks
-Mike
 

specialx

Disabled Account
2002-09-19 1:08 am
I've had a read over that, sorry I didn't mention it, but they jsut recommend multimeters, I am more interested to know what people look for in a multimeter, so I can make a better judgement for a cheaper one, as a Fluke product is out of my budget, wel lthe one's i found in online stores accessible to me.

I tried some online stuff by searching google but nothign had anythign concrete on what to look for.

-Mike
 

Vovk Z

Member
2011-10-30 10:32 pm
Kyiv
Building power amplifiers doesn't something special. Mostly you have to measure U, R. You typically need any popular DMM, plus oscilloscope, plus it is desurable to have dedicated RLC-meter. It is ok if your DMM has a capacitance function too, but better to have special RLC-meter, or at least some cheap Chinese multy-tester.
 
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H713

Member
2017-11-24 11:21 pm
Madison WI
Building power amplifiers doesn't something special. Mostly you have to measure U, R. You typically need any popular DMM, plus oscilloscope, plus it is desurable to have dedicated RLC-meter. It is ok if your DMM has a capacitance function too, but better to have special RLC-meter, or at least some cheap Chinese multy-tester.
You realize that the last post in this thread was almost 20 years ago, right? That post was written when having a Pentium 4 made you the cool kid on the block.