What adhesive to use for Sorbothane?

I'm building a multi-layer platform for my TT - 2" HDF (yes, not MDF) followed by a 3/16" layer of Duro 30 Sorbothane, followed by a 3/8" sheet of granite. The HDF is smooth finished, but the granite has one smooth side and one side that would require a fill type adhesive.

I'd like to know what non water-evaporative adhesive I can use on Sorbothane. In the HDF layer I was wondering if I could use something like 3M Spray 80. In the granite layer I'm not sure what I could use. Both interfaces would require high bonding strength due to the nature of the weight involved.
 
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Hmm, I hadn't thought of tape. I thought tape would have a higher possibility of failing (peeling away under the weight of these materials). After I posted this I spoke to a support person at the place where I bought the Sorbothane. He said that for the Sorbothane to HDF interface, 3M Spray 80 shoukd work well, and that for the granite layer I should use Gorilla Glue (!) as I would probably need some gap filling there.
 
Tony,
The Gorilla glue is a single component urethane adhesive. It dries by a reaction with the moisture in air. There are many urethane adhesives that would do the job on a porous surface such a granite. A two component urethane is 3M 3532 You would also be able to use many epoxy adhesives. 3M 2216 is a high strength epoxy. A spray adhesive could work but would have no gap filling properties and have less surface bonding strength but you probably wouldn't have a problem with either approach as you will have a fairly large surface contact area either way.
 
CAl,
That would be entirely to easy, to follow the manufacturers recommendations! Where is the creativity in that, how will he know how to screw it all up!

Oh, so funny. In fact I went to the Sorbothane website before even posting this note, and I can't find Lord 7650 or 7542A/B in a small enough quantity for the limited use I have. On the flip side, flexible super glues don't come in a large enough size for what I need, to make them cost effective. That leaves neoprene glues; since the website made no brand receommendation for those I looked around and what most often came up seemed to be glues for neoprene wetsuits. Since I wasn't sure if that was the right stuff I thought that maybe someone out here has already tried something else successfully. But I guess that's asking too much. :rolleyes:
 
tvrgeek,
I said that earlier about the moisture in the air being the reactive component with the Gorilla glue. It isn't a catalyst per say, the reaction is between the Isocyanate component and water. This reaction becomes part of the urethane chain and at the same time is what makes it create the foamy look if you leave it exposed to the air. Water in the reaction causes CO2 to form in the reaction, we used this in foam formulations after CFC's were banned for the production of flexible foam materials.
 
I called Sorbothane. Had a very educational discussion about bonding materials with different energy constants. It turns out for my application I'd need either a bonding tape with different bonding strengths on each side (which is available for this kind of Sorbothane bonding), or no bonding adhesive at all. The technician recommended I try it with no bonding first.