Ways other than L-Pad to reduce sensitivity of horns?

Puggie

Member
2004-10-11 5:21 pm
I'm planning a midbass and horn setup and want to go passive. I realise I need to seriously attenuate the horns (approx 105dB efficiency and 8Ohm drivers) in relation to the midbass (approx 89dB efficiency and 4ohm) my amp is happily 2 ohm stable.

I know I can use a simple Lpad (I have a variable rotary L-pad for initially setting the horn level) but would their be any benefit (bear in mind I have already built the Xover so don't want to change the driver impedance) in running a 16Ohm compression driver with a 16ohm resistor in parallel to get my 8 Ohm load. This would reduce the sensitivity without having a resistor in series. Would this be any better than an L-Pad, I have heard people saying that series resistors can 'suck the life' out of detailed treble units.
 
Puggie said:
I'm planning a midbass and horn setup and want to go passive. I realise I need to seriously attenuate the horns (approx 105dB efficiency and 8Ohm drivers) in relation to the midbass (approx 89dB efficiency and 4ohm) my amp is happily 2 ohm stable.

I know I can use a simple Lpad (I have a variable rotary L-pad for initially setting the horn level) but would their be any benefit (bear in mind I have already built the Xover so don't want to change the driver impedance) in running a 16Ohm compression driver with a 16ohm resistor in parallel to get my 8 Ohm load. This would reduce the sensitivity without having a resistor in series. Would this be any better than an L-Pad, I have heard people saying that series resistors can 'suck the life' out of detailed treble units.

You can try to simply use resistors... if you really think those efficency figures are accurate
 
Radio Shack has a transformer volume control for controlling speakers in another room. The stereo version has two step down transformers on it. I just used them to cut down my 95dB tweeters to match the 85dB woofers. The initial listening test is very good. if you don't mind buying a product and tearing it apart for parts it may work for you.
The draw back is the first two steps are 3dB each followed by 2dB steps for a total of 22 dB in ten steps.

Radio Shack Part Number
mono 40-993
Stereo 40-987

Brian
 

CLS

Member
2005-06-17 6:58 am
Taiwan
roddyama said:


I second that.

Active xover or passive line stage xover are even better.
Try that, you'll never go back.

Any attenuation between amp & drivers would suck the life out of them. The larger the attenuation, the worse.

Filters in line stage are much easier to be done right. Low power amps for mid-high are also not hard to build or expensive to buy.

If you have to have xover, be it mechanically (full range), or in line stage.