Very basic question...

As a complete novice to most things DIY, I've come here seeking some answers to some fairly basic questions.

I'd quite like to build a portable speaker that would run off of a 9v battery and has an on/off switch and a volume knob. Any tutorials or instructions I've seen online seem to be missing this for some reason and thus I have absolutely no idea where to start. What materials I need, and is it a job that a total novice would be able to convincingly pull off?

I was considering one of these two drivers, but really only because they're names I've heard being recommended before...

Peerless 830987 - Peerless 830987
Fostex FE83En - Fostex FE83En

Any information or guidance would be so appreciated!
 
Thanks for the reply but I'm really sorry, you're gonna have to put that into real layman's terms...

I did a quick google of 'TDA2822' and came to two conclusions;
One being that I really don't know anything about electronics and that possibly this could be too ambitious for a first project,
And the second being that it appears the circuit is for two speakers in stereo whereas I will only be having the one, will this make a difference??
 
Okay no problem.
A 9V battery doesn't contain enough energy for a power amp IMO. Run time vs. cost is lousy.
If this will be a portable unit, you should specify the maximum size and weight you are willing to live with. Then you'll want a power amp that fits the speaker and power supply choices, keeping everything within your "portability" goals. The speaker and power source will determine the size and weight of the finished unit.
I mentioned the TDA2822 as example, and yes it is a stereo chip. You can bridge the outputs for a single speaker. That will get you a boost in output for a given supply voltage.
This is not too ambitious a first project; it's actually a great place to start. Look around for a kit that includes a printed circuit board and provides for a "BTL" (Bridge Tied Load) output.
Forum members will help you along throughout your build.
 
Hi there,

I'd grab one of these:
DC 12V Mini Amplifier Board 10W+10W Class D Amplifier | eBay

It will run off 5 to 15v input (ie, anything from 4x AA batteries to a car battery), and pass a decent amount of power to the speakers.
You'll need a 3.5mm jack cable (the normal AUX cables for iPods and stuff), an 8xAA battery holder from Maplin, and a connector to go from the battery pack to the amplifier circuitry.
Oh, and a switch, which goes between the batteries and the amplifier.

In the mean time, have a read here:
DIY Audio Articles

I'd go with a pair of the Peerless driver, that way you'll get some resemblence of stereo.

You could literally cut a couple of holes in a plastic butty (/sandwich) box and wire everything up, and you're good to go.

Chris

PS - where abouts in the UK are you?
If you're anywhere near me I'd be willing to teach you some soldering and general skills you'll need, once my exams and stuff are out the way.
 
Thanks for the advice guys, 4x AA batteries seems to be the way to go so thanks for pointing that one out. Originally I was under the impression that I was going to have to make the whole circuit board from scratch but the mini amplifier Chris posted is perfect.

How would I know where to where to hook up all the wires?

Does the Ohmage of the speakers bare any relevance to this too?
 
9V PP3 batteries may be fine for headphone amps and transistor radios, but IMO they aren't suitable for active speakers.
Agreed, PP3s are hopeless. PP9 batteries are good though.

I think you'd be further ahead using 4x AA...
IMO, D cells would be much better than AA - much higher capacity and lower cost/capacity. They're also better suited for high current applications.
 
Thanks for the advice guys, 4x AA batteries seems to be the way to go so thanks for pointing that one out. Originally I was under the impression that I was going to have to make the whole circuit board from scratch but the mini amplifier Chris posted is perfect.

How would I know where to where to hook up all the wires?

Does the Ohmage of the speakers bare any relevance to this too?
I would contact the seller and ask him these questions. It may come with some documentation.
 
Monacor speakers are a good value but I think you will find that the Vifa sounds better. The TC9FD is a sibling of the Peerless 830987 but less expensive and with pretty good performance.

I would go with this setup using the TPA3110 class D amp - very efficient (and Texas Instrument class D amps sound fantastic) so your batteries will last long. 2x8W @ 4 Ohm TPA3110 Class-D Audio Amplifier Board Only 320-329 $10 USD.
The for the driver, go with Vifa TC9FD - one of the best driver values for the money. Vifa TC9FD-18-08 3-1/2" Full Range Paper Cone Woofer 264-1062 $24 USD/pair.
For batteries, use two 6 v (4R25) lantern batteries for 12 volts, or a sealed lead acid 12 volt. $13 USD. UPG D5741 - UB1250 - AGM Battery - Sealed Lead Acid - 12 Volt - 5 Ah Capacity - F1 Terminal
For the enclosure, go with sealed 5 liter (each) and that will get you down to 125 Hz. If you use an 11 liter box with a 2 in dia x 4.25 in long port, you will get 60 Hz of pretty punchy bass.
You will need a 3.5 mm to 3.5 mm stereo jack/cord to plug your source into your amp, some wires to connect the batteries to the amp, and speaker wire. You will need a battery charger - you probably have a car battery charger somewhere or use a 12v SMPS brick.
 
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Sorry, I live down by Kingston-upon-Thames so not really local at all I'm afraid!

These are only 2.5" but I'm assuming the quality would defiantly surpass the Visatons - 830984 - Peerless 2,5 inch full range - Europe Audio

This may sound stupidly obvious, but what do I use to hook everything up? Is there any particular wire/cabling I should be using?


Yeah, I'd expect the quality of those Peerless to be considerably better.

With that eBay board, you'll need a few bits to get it working...

Shopping list:
Rigid PP3 Battery Clip : Battery Clips : Maplin Electronics
AA Size Battery Holders : Battery Boxes : Maplin Electronics - 8x AA. I get around 6 hours with rechargable batteries, running the amplifier at maximum volume.
DC Power Plugs : DC Power Connectors : Maplin Electronics - scroll down for the 2.1/5.5mm one.
Slim Line Rocker Switch : Rocker Switches : Maplin Electronics

You'll also need a 3.5mm jack to jack lead, but I expect you can find one of those yourself ;)

You'll also need a few bits of wire, go for single core wire, doesn't need to be thick or anything, as this is a low power unit.

Here's what you're aiming for with the power adapter:
[IMGDEAD]https://fbcdn-sphotos-h-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash3/943392_10200345687419601_120006148_n.jpg[/IMGDEAD]

Put the switch inline on the red lead.

HTH
Chris

PS - its worth buying some rechargable AAs if you don't have them already.
My local Maplin is also selling 24x AA batteries for £4, so I've stocked up a bit. Not sure if yours will have the same offer, but worth picking up on if they do.
PPS - you'll also be able to use a normal 9v battery for emergency power :D