veneer, enamel or lacquer

After Pinkmouse's advice:

Use something that dries faster than rustoleum. Find a car laquer that is the colour that you want and use it. Speaking about spray cans. If you have a spray gun get a pigmented laquer the colour you want.

Why?

An oil based paint like the rustolwum will take along time to dry. It will get a lot more dust trapped in the surface, along with bugs and all sorts of wierd things. It will be a pain compared toa fast drying laquer.

Mark
 

lemans23

Member
2005-03-22 5:12 pm
USA
Re: After Pinkmouse's advice:

mwmkravchenko said:
Use something that dries faster than rustoleum. Find a car laquer that is the colour that you want and use it. Speaking about spray cans. If you have a spray gun get a pigmented laquer the colour you want.

Why?

An oil based paint like the rustolwum will take along time to dry. It will get a lot more dust trapped in the surface, along with bugs and all sorts of wierd things. It will be a pain compared toa fast drying laquer.

Mark

what do you suggest then?
 
This is what I sugest

Find a car laquer that is the colour that you want

If the rustoleum is truly a fast drying laquer than you are fine. If it is an slow drying oil based paint then you will have the trouble that I mentioned. So the advice in a nutshell is something that dries fast. ( flashes off in about 5 minutes )

Mark
 
Pretty much the same thing

I live in Canada my friend. I have acces to all the brands that you do. But I don't know what is available to you locally. The key to remember is the laquer base. Any car paint that you find in a can will be a laquer base if they say that it dries to the touch in about 20 minutes.

Brands are not that big a deal untill you get good enough to tell the differences. A frankly I have sprayed so many things with so many different paints that it amounts to build/coat and flash time. Any good quality car paint will do a good job. Surface prep is the most important thing.

I hope this helps!

Mark
 

lemans23

Member
2005-03-22 5:12 pm
USA
warren o said:
You just need to seal the wood. A thin quick coat of polyurethane will do that.
Then check your library for Bob Flexner’s "Understanding Wood Finishing" book on finishing wood. He has written the seminal text on it & it is easier than you think. Much less sanding that you would imagine.

i did 4 coats of polyurethane sandable primer/sealer, starting with 150 grit ending with 320 grit. i hope its alright cause it feels like i could iceskate on it it's so smooth
:devilr:
 
lemans23 said:


i did 4 coats of polyurethane sandable primer/sealer, starting with 150 grit ending with 320 grit. i hope its alright cause it feels like i could iceskate on it it's so smooth
:devilr:
I think the 320 paper, oops, coated abrasive sheet is a bit of overkill, but you have the results that you wanted and that is all that matters! If you are using a finish that is not water based, you can get the #0, #00, #000 & #0000 steel wool to sand; it is cheaper and works great. Not for water based, as the small steel pieces that come off may turn into iron oxide and poo your nice speakers!

Some folks use gesso as a filler for large grained wood like oak. They sand it down & then stain & seal it for a smooth finish. I have seen pro’s use Bondo for dent & damage filler on large speaker cabs that get painted or have the vinyl sheets attached.