Using 60HZ equipment in 50HZ environment.

Hello,

I'm moving soon and want to know if I can use electrical equipment, say my Kenwood VR-309AV receiver rated at 120V 2.6 A 60HZ in 220V 50HZ environment.? The owner's manual state that it's rated at 120V and 60HZ. The voltage difference I can deal with using a step down transformer to change the 220V down to 110-120V, but what about the difference in AC frequency? I don't think a step down tranny will change the AC frequency. Right? Would I be able to get away with using this euipment at 110V and 50HZ? Would it not work at all? What about other devices such as VARIAC rated for 60HZ? What about other equipment like cd player and cassette deck?

Thanks a bunch!

ABMOGGY
 
bocka said:

I've seen a trafo burning. Never use equipment which is designed for 60 Hz in a 50 Hz environment. Only the other way round works.

That transformer having burned had nothing to do with the different cycles. Something else happened, and it would have happened whatever the cycling, because there was another more important thing: different voltage.

What has to be considered is the new voltage and always use a voltage adaptor: 110v to 220v or 220v to 110v.

The problem is that many countries have lately adopted 240v as their standard, and if the voltage adaptor/transformer is not the correct voltage it will feed more volts into your amp. That can certainly burn a transformer in the long time, particularly more if you push it during use. If possible get a transformer that can be switched between 220v and 240v.

What cycles will affect are motorized electronics, like turntables and some tape decks. If the motors are crystal controlled there won't be any problems.

Try to get proper voltage adaptors, that isolate the primaries from the secondaries, instead of what they call auto-transformers. A properly isolated transformer will probably even benefit your audio, as your trasnformer will be isolated from most AC garbage.


Carlos
 

forr

Member
2004-12-01 6:46 pm
Next door
Impedance of an inductance (a transfo) at 50 Hz is less than at 60 Hz
So, if a transfo is designed for 60 Hz only, it may well burn when used with 50 Hz because more current than intended flows throught it.

I have seen such burnt transfos a lot of times in small little desk lamps my father bought in USA. They were used in France (my house was at the old 110 V standard ) and never last more than six monthes.
I understood the reason only ten years later.

~~~~~~~~ Forr

§§§
 
Actually, what matters with transformers (neglecting core losses) is the Volts/frequency relationship. This means that any transformer rated at 120V 60Hz is guaranteed to operate happily at 100V 50Hz, at 240V 120Hz or even at 40V 20Hz...

So if you want to be in the safe side, just get a step-down transformer taht produces a voltage slightly lower than 120V, for example 105V or 110V. Due to the lower voltage the performance of some equipment may degrade a bit, though, but it won't be damaged.
 
Thank you all for the reply. I opened up the Kenwood to see the power transformer. I don't see any extra taps for the primary, so I'm probably not going to be able to change voltage. :(
I'll be checking the local voltage when I'm there :D (Thailand 220V 50HZ I think) with a DMM first then I'm thinking of having a local shop wind me a BIG STEP DOWN transformer from 220V or what ever to 100V and 110V tap. Hopefully I'll be safe. :rolleyes:

ABMOGGY
 
That transformer having burned had nothing to do with the different cycles. Something else happened, and it would have happened whatever the cycling, because there was another more important thing: different voltage.

NO! The trafo may go into saturation and draws large amounts of current which causes overheating. At 50Hz the flux density is higher than rated at 60Hz. As I can tell you it was not the different voltage, because I've used a variac.
 
abmoggy,

If you're moving to Thailand EXPECT wild voltage fluctuations and power outages during the wet season, so allow for this????

More importantly, if in Bangkok beware of air pollution and mosquito borne encephalitis. Don't drink the water, it's barely filtered Chayo Phyra (river) water. Also stray community dogs carry rabies (>25%). I could go on...


It's interesting.

Cheers,
Greg