two in one week!

Chinese sourced plywood - two different products and suppliers, found in the same week.

First ring in raw "Dragon" meranti -machined on CNC - maybe needed a bit more glue? :D

The second one is far scarier - prefinished cabinet plywood, cut on beam saw ( main and scoring blade set over $400) - that's a rock firmly pressed between plies. Panel surface was "flawless" on both sides, absolutely no clue as to presence of "foreign object" .
Good thing this wasn't machined by hand with a router - that'd make for some interesting fireworks, and just thinking about liability for injury .... :eek:
 

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Chinese sourced plywood - two different products and suppliers, found in the same week.

First ring in raw "Dragon" meranti -machined on CNC - maybe needed a bit more glue? :D

The second one is far scarier - prefinished cabinet plywood, cut on beam saw ( main and scoring blade set over $400) - that's a rock firmly pressed between plies. Panel surface was "flawless" on both sides, absolutely no clue as to presence of "foreign object" .
Good thing this wasn't machined by hand with a router - that'd make for some interesting fireworks, and just thinking about liability for injury .... :eek:

The stone is an obvious but usually rare flaw in production.

The separated plies are not uncommon and need not be an adverse reflection on the quality of original production. It looks like the ply was orn apart in the middle of the ply, and this can be the result of very rough handling after the plywood sheet was produced.

Of course I'm just looking at pictures, and I might reach a different conclusion if I were on the scene.
 
arny - we process several thousands of sheets of various types of plywood, MDF and melamine a year, from sources in domestic NA, European and the Orient, and in over 20 years as best as I can remember the delamination as seen in the photo has occurred mainly with the Chinese, and twice with Russian Baltic Birch. With the Euro sourced baltic birch "platform" even the tightest CNC machining patterns that leave very narrow margins on internal dadoes don't explode like that - so I'd tend to dispute your suggestion that it was not a production quality control problem.


The rock was the scary part. Oh yeah, we once found an approx 1/4x20 threaded machine screw inside a layer of super budget priced BC pressed melamine. That did far more damage to the saw blades than the little rock.