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tube equalizer

Thatch_Ear said:
Go active cross and forget the EQ. If the recording aint good enough, listen to something else. My opinion.

there was a little missunderstanding: I need it for recording/ studio purposes (tracking, mixing, processing vocals etc....).
because good (vintage) recording tube gear is hard to find or very expensive
(I saw a pultec EQP-1 tube equalizer selling for us$ 2900 lately on ebay) I intend to start some diy projects. I did a lot of audio circuit design based on opamps, but I appreciate the lovely sound of tubes (I guess you too, otherwise you would never read this :))
I visited a lot of tube/tubeamp sites the last days, and I learned a lot about tube circuits...so thanx to all hosting those informative sites, posting links and information on this forum! ...couldn´t get my hands on some good parametric equalizer schemos yet(except the pultec) , but if someone has a good differetial amplifier schematic (so I can built my own LC networks around) this would help me a lot to get started.

thanx for the replies,
massive
 
Your getting way out of my league pal! I hope you get what you want so great music still can be recorded in a great format. I know someone that might be able to help you if you want check out his site and drop him a line. He has a lot of pro gear for studios but not what you are looking for, but he does have 30 years of tube audio connections. Luck to you.
<http://home.att.net/~chimeraone/index.html>
 

Brett

Member
2002-01-07 6:02 pm
<b>massivpassiv sez

</b>
does somebody know a good resource for tube equalizer info?

Some good pointers here.

http://www.tubecad.com/articles_2002/Missing_Sonic_Controls/Sonic_Controls.pdf

<b>Thatch ear sez</b>

If the recording aint good enough, listen to something else.

Sorry but there are soooooo many badly recorded, but musically exceptional pieces out there, that the opportunity to 'modify' something that otherwise sounds pretty mediocre to increase ones enjoyment of it seems fairly sensible to me, whereas missing out on it doesn't. There are ways to do it that don't change to signal for the good recordings. John Broskies article that I've linked above was heretical (to most 'philes) and I found it funny and eminently sensible. BTW, have you wired out the tone controls on your 400?