Top five uses for chip amps

I just received a 2.1 chan "T" amp in the mail and am splicing it onto the board of a CD/AM/FM Sony clock radio. I realize this is not the typical application for these amps. I 've been getting acquainted with these amps in this forum and elsewhere but have missed the bigger picture as to where they're being commonly used.

What're the top five use for these things? I expect that many are used between an Ipod, Iphone, or cellphone to run a set of computer/desktop speakers. Some must be used in a standard stereo system between the preamp and speakers. Some are probably used as dedicated speaker amps mounted in the cabinets? Being medium voltage DC many will be used in mobile auto/marine applications. I don't know.

For some strange reason, as much as they are discussed ad nauseum here and elsewhere, the OP usually just leaves out what the application is intended to be.
 
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Did I miss the 800 lb gorilla in the room? I wasn't (i thought) curious about the least common applications for these. The history of the gainclone as prehistory of these amps is interesting but not what I'd asked about.

Oh well. Not an important question i suppose. I had just wondered
 

tommy55

Member
2012-04-21 3:34 am
Sorry to send you prehistoric of gainclone.
I just want to let you know that I'd used these kind of amplifier in what way.

In Thailand we have a lot of 2.1 channel amp, first normally used with desk-top computer/notebook for listening music and computer game.
Later they applied for standalone size with equalizer and can use usb/card reader for pindrive/flash drive/memorystick and can splicing with cd/dvd portable player for amplifing in party.
Some their rms watts is higer than 1500W.
 
The most common use has to be in computer speakers. A stereo chip, a 12V transformer and sometimes even a tone control, all jammed into the bottom of one speaker and yours for £6. The better ones then get used in TVs and monitors, or even in tack-on speakers for flat screens. After that, your guess is as good as mine, but all the audio outputs on cards or motherboards will be single or dual chips, probably Class D. Then maybe automotive, where they will be unquestionably Class D. Miles down the list will be people struggling to make decent hi fi amplifiers out of them.

Check out the amps that TI are making and see who they are targeting for a more comprehensive answer to your question.
 

johnr66

Member
2009-03-05 1:55 pm
Okay, here's what I've done with a TDA2040:

1) Wired as an oscillator with slow period to blink power LEDs. With Vs=9v, I ran two high power LEDs in series. Because output is either off or saturated, very little dissipation from IC, no heatsink needed.

2) Motor driver. using varying DC on the input, I could control a motor on the output and even reverse direction on dual supply.

3) As in the other reply, I fed the output into a 9v transformer to step up the voltage to 120v to safely experiment with some ac circuits.

4) Not really a use, but I fed video signals into several power amp ICs to see if they had the bandwidth to handle such a signal. Many produced a color picture on the screen.
 
I'm sorry, I think I almost completely misunderstood the more specific definition of "chip amp". That's why I was confused by the answer. I'm not very well educated in electronics. By chip amp I was thinking more than just amp-on-a-chip ICs. I thought the forum was more focused on the more fully fledged amp like the one I referred to in the first post.

Is it more appropriate to post questions about these boards in the Solid State forum section?
 
Okay, here's what I've done with a TDA2040:

1) Wired as an oscillator with slow period to blink power LEDs. With Vs=9v, I ran two high power LEDs in series. Because output is either off or saturated, very little dissipation from IC, no heatsink needed.

2) Motor driver. using varying DC on the input, I could control a motor on the output and even reverse direction on dual supply.

3) As in the other reply, I fed the output into a 9v transformer to step up the voltage to 120v to safely experiment with some ac circuits.

4) Not really a use, but I fed video signals into several power amp ICs to see if they had the bandwidth to handle such a signal. Many produced a color picture on the screen.

thats awesome
 

Mihkus

Member
2012-07-22 8:01 pm
555 timer + 3 tda7293 in bridge= high power oscillator for many uses from transformer testing to speaker blowing :)

Those 12V car amplifiers ive used for step up or down smps

Fun lots of fun with chipamps You can add output transistors and build even high power smps
 
555 timer + 3 tda7293 in bridge= high power oscillator for many uses from transformer testing to speaker blowing :)

Those 12V car amplifiers ive used for step up or down smps

Fun lots of fun with chipamps You can add output transistors and build even high power smps

Just how do you "bridge" three TDA7293s? Do you mean perhaps the master/slave parallel connection?