taking the gain pots out of the "mix"

I run the music elective program as artist in residence at Wyncote Academy. Most private schools have no music budget so I bought a cheap Technical Pro TA1250 power amp and then removed the gain pots and changed the inputs to 1/4 inch. I was getting drop outs with the RCAs. The amp was set up for mono bridging so I eliminated that when I bypassed the PCB that made such bridging possible. So far no problem. All the class equipment is run into a Behringer MX802A so that source is how I set the power amp response. I eliminated the gain pots on the front because the LD students felt (while I was busy in another room) they could boost the level. Best decision I have made. Yes, they could blow the amp and speakers via the Behringer but they haven't caught on to that possibility. I HATE gain pots on stereo power amps. They needn't be there. Any challenges? John Poole wyncoteacademy.org/
 
Thanks, I just remind them if they clip the speakers then that is it! I can bring in some combs with wax paper for group kazooing. What was happening was even though I set the gain pots at max they would twist them further and so gone they were! The speakers are surprisingly resilient. Cheap Stageworks S12CDH. I have them facing up from the floor on 5 inch risers. Once the compression horn fell off the plastic bevel and into the box. Hell, they still sounded fine and we are driving two electronic drum sets and synths. Maybe I just got lucky with those speakers from Sam Ash. I prefer not to use limiters or compressors for class. On a gig that is a different story. John Poole
 
I would think than an unattended class is worse than any gig :confused:

There's the old story about the USS Missouri, where Japan's surrender was signed in 1945, which tells that it survived Pacific War battles against the Japanese Navy, Kamikaze attacks, etc .... and was all but destroyed by visiting schoolkids
[IMGDEAD]http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/images/h62000/h62696.jpg[/IMGDEAD]
 
Thanks for the sympathy but the gig isn't too bad at times. I've learned a little about piezo transducer swap outs, keybed sensor replacement, cables, jacks, plugs etc which has come in useful in servicing my own personal gear.
Your comment about the battleship's travails reminded me of Pablo Picasso's contrary experience that children or animals running amok in his studio never harmed anything but when an adult visited they would end up breaking or damaging something.
 
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conanski

Member
2013-03-31 3:53 am
I run the music elective program as artist in residence at Wyncote Academy. Most private schools have no music budget so I bought a cheap Technical Pro TA1250 power amp and then removed the gain pots and changed the inputs to 1/4 inch. The amp was set up for mono bridging so I eliminated that when I bypassed the PCB that made such bridging possible. I eliminated the gain pots on the front because the LD students felt (while I was busy in another room) they could boost the level. Best decision I have made. I HATE gain pots on stereo power amps. They needn't be there.

I don't understand what you are trying to achieve here. You work at an educational institution so I would have thought the goal was to educate the students about audio principles and the correct way to operate and utilize all the features of professional sound equipment. But instead you expose them to modified gear that they will likely never see again and when they have to use that gear they will have no idea how to do it correctly.
 
I would think music education at the middle school level would be more about the music, not the equipment. I was lucky enough to hear "Hall of the Mountain King" over a 6" diameter 16 mm film projector speaker in 5th grade, which helped me to decide to study bassoon. (Great choice, super lead parts!). Of the kids in that class, I was the only one that made All State Band 7 years later, so music education is not of great importance for everybody subjected to it.
This system sounds as if the music would be much more realistic.
Kids learn weird things from their contemporaries. Blowing out the woofers is a fun game for 20 year olds with a car boomer system and too much pocket money from living at home, but is a one time event (not very musical) on a school budget.
 
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