Subwoofer low output

child1

Member
2013-01-18 7:24 am
Hello there!

I have just finished a build of an active subwoofer with a TDA7294 chip amp inside. I have connected it to a soundbar I have build also. Inside the soundbar is a 2. order active filter for the sub. Now, my problem is that the output of the subwoofer is very low compared to the soundbar. I would like it to be twice as loud i think. What can I do. Do i really need to add a small amplifier circuit on the input of the subwoofer to make the input signal amplitude larger?

Any tips or ideas is appreciated :)

/Mads
 

Mooly

Administrator
Paid Member
2007-09-15 8:14 am
You could probably just alter the feedback factor of the power amp. Halve the value of R2 (approx) and double the value of C2
 

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Mooly

Administrator
Paid Member
2007-09-15 8:14 am
There shouldn't be any downsides for your application.

Try and locate those actual components in your amp and we'll take it from there. The circuit I posted is the standard application note. Yours will be similar but may have slightly different values. So see what is fitted. Its just a case of lowering the value of that resistor (whatever it is) and raising the value of the cap in a similar ratio.
 
@mooley - would it be okay with 47uF and 330ohm? Sounds like an easy fix... any downsides? :)

@DUG - My sub is not going further down than about 36 Hz (its a small system), so i dont think that is a problem, but i could be wrong? :)

Typical recommendation is to set the -3 dB point at no more than one-tenth to one-hundredth of the frequency that you don't want to have any effect on. So, 3.6 Hz or lower. Not sure how much difference it might make.
 

Mooly

Administrator
Paid Member
2007-09-15 8:14 am
If you've identified the components correctly then it must be doing what it should... it can't not do. It is absolutely "cast in stone" that those components set the voltage gain of the amp. In the above circuit the voltage gain is 22K/680+1 which is 32. Your new values are 22K/330 + 1 which is 66.

So what do we do...

We prove it :) (which will make sure the correct parts have been identified). Two minutes of a job to test. A scope or DVM can be used (DVM on AC voltage).

1. Get yourself a test tone burned onto CDR (there are two here in post number #2 if you haven't any. Choose the 120Hz track),

http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/mult...much-voltage-power-do-your-speakers-need.html

2. Connect the DVM across the speaker and set the meter to AC volts. Use a low range for best resolution.

3. Leaving your amp exactly as it is now play the tone and adjust the volume for some convenient level on the DVM. It can be anything that is accurately resolved and displayed on the meter, for example 100 millivolts or 1.394 volts, anything.

4. Write down the result and leave the volume settings exactly as they are.

5. Now, either refit the 680 ohm back in place of the new 330 ohm OR, tack the 680 ohm across the 330 ohm currently fitted. Whichever is easiest. Leave the new cap as it is.

So you now have either 680 ohm or a new value of 222 ohm (the two in parallel) in circuit.

6. Repeat the test and write down the new level.

Whatcha' got ? :D
 

child1

Member
2013-01-18 7:24 am
I bet you are right - perhaps I just cant hear the difference with the input signal I have tested with. I'll try some other signals tonight, and post what happens. :D

Anywho - I am absolutely certain of the values as I have made the amplifier from scratch... :) so I'll give it another go and see what happens.

Thanks!