Springtime and trees.

This wonderful tree has a history. Now is springtime in the Southern
Hemisphere and it exploded in white flowers, as several years it didn't
because the storms damaged the early flowers.

It is a `grandson' of a couple of trees that a Japanese man gifted to my
grandfather and grandmother (Roberto and Zulema, respectively). Roberto was
a shoe maker and Zulema, a teacher nd piano professor, he saled what he
produced. One of his clients, was the japanese gentleman, and the pair of
trees was a pink flowered an the other a white flowered one. They planted?
them at their house in Banfield Oeste (West Banfield, in Buenos Aires)
and both became a large trees with wonderful flowers, although their fruits
are small and they rot early and pass in a very short time from the
in-maturate to rotting, although the fruits are eatable and very sweet.
It is, as we can see, a peach ornament.
The pink tree was died along this time, but the white ones were saved
creating sons from its pie. From it, a new tree was planted at Father's
house, and a fungi killed it some years ago. They are very delicate in this
aspect. But from it, 7 new sons was made, saving again, their seeds. From
it, I did new seven sons, one of them is the depicted below, two of them
were gifted and the reminding four were planted near their "father", one of
the becomes broken by an unknown person, but the other three are still
alive at Father's house, in Banfield Este (East Banfield).

Their white flowers and the green leaves make honor to the Banfield's flag.

So, when I saw it from my window, I remember my Grandfather and Grandmother's
house, a very large one certainly, sold several time ago when they dead.

I want to share its wonderfulness with you.

Note: I am not English native speaker, I learned it when boy, and I don't know exactly if the terminology "Son" and "Father" are applicable to plants and animals. So my apologies if I am wrong.
 

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Osvaldo, your English is great. Too many of us English speakers cannot return the favor of speaking in your language.

Thanks for sharing your wonderful story and photos, personal history is priceless.

There is a tree in my town with a hole in the trunk. My father (now 86) drove me there a few years back and told me that his grandfather lived there and he would bump his Model T against that tree every day when he got home to stop the engine instead of turning it off. That's why the hole is there.
 
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PRR

Member
Paid Member
2003-06-12 7:04 pm
Maine USA
www.diyaudio.com
Thanks for the tree story.

Our first house had been owned by a gardener. However she grew old and stopped tending the plants about 20 years before the house was sold to us. We found some very unusual things she planted, now a "jungle". Osage Orange is very rare in New Jersey; this one was huge (and vicious). Roses growing over the power line and back. A Siberian Elm, planted because other types of Elms were dying of a fungus; however being choked by English Ivy. Across the road, a monumental Poison Ivy growing 70 feet up a Maple tree.

Here, history is short. The previous owner planted some fruit trees. The Apple does what apple trees do: got very overgrown. The Pear did not do well for him. It was trunk-rotted and nearly dead when we came. We pruned dead wood and fertilized, it came back very well! And then the Porcupine decided to eat the top leaves. There are Old World and New World porkies, you may have our tree-climbing type north of you. Our species grows to 18 kg (40 lb), and our "friend" must at the top of that range. He broke half the branches off.

We get tons of cooking apples every other year. We have not yet had a pear.

It's the other side of the year here. No tree flowers.
 
Thanks for your input. I several time planted apple trees from their seeds, but my neighbors broken them. They are very savage and do not evaluate what a tree is. Only one woman near me said a word about the tree and its flowers, the rest are ignorants.
As I read the document published in the 60's by Cleeve Backster about the primary plant perception, I feel they really feel something (Pardon by the redundancy) and talk to them.
 
Thanks for the tree story.

Our first house had been owned by a gardener. However she grew old and stopped tending the plants about 20 years before the house was sold to us.

I found out that if you don't tend your garden it will change a lot over the years. I have one plot I planted 20 years ago. I don't even remember what I originally planted. For years all I did was try to keep the weeds out. It got terribly overgrown, with a riot of midsummer blooms and not much else (some sedum for the fall). Then it thinned out and eventually became mostly phlox and columbine, which is pleasant. I planted the phlox but not the columbine. And now I've dug about a third of it up and replanted it with mostly existing plants, which looks nicely manicured.

I hope you reworked that old garden. In general, old, overgrown plants respond very well to being cut way back. There were some nasty, ghoulish, overgrown bushes on my lot. I cut them all way back. Some I cut back almost to the ground. They all looked great within two years.
 

PRR

Member
Paid Member
2003-06-12 7:04 pm
Maine USA
www.diyaudio.com
> tree climbing porcupines?

I'm no expert. Never saw one before my first month in Maine. "Something" was under the porch. It didn't run away, just turned its back on my flashlight. Eventually I realized it was longer than 4 deckboards wide, and had spines.

Google told me that the New World and Old World porkies are different; yours probably don't climb trees.

Mine does, I have proof! He's camera-shy, but here is our porcupine hiding behind the trunk of the poor pear tree he is eating and breaking.
 

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PRR

Member
Paid Member
2003-06-12 7:04 pm
Maine USA
www.diyaudio.com
We are derailing the thread...

...Never saw one before my first month in Maine. "Something" was under the porch. It didn't run away, just turned its back on my flashlight. Eventually I realized it was longer than 4 deckboards wide, and had spines. ...

Here's the one under my deck 10 years ago. Most critters will turn and fight/bite. Porcupines turn their back on you.
 

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The UK's only spiny mammal is the hedgehog, and it doesn't even climb hedges!
Hedgehogs roll up so that they are spiny on all sides if they are disturbed.
They soon unroll again of you put a bowl of dog or cat food in front of them.
I once gave one some raw steak and it unrolled and ate the lot.
They usually eat slugs and worms and sometimes beetles.