Small full-range driver

reinhout

Member
2017-11-24 3:29 pm
Hello,

I want to start learning how a DSP works and what I can do with it. I'm planning on buying the dayton dsp-408 and Minidsp umik-1 as my measuring mic.

As for a driver I'm looking to buy 4 small drivers (around 100mm in diameter) so I can experiment with the placement of the speakers, eq the speakers themselves, tinker with room correction and so on. When I'm not tinkering, I would like to be able to enjoy the general quality of the speakers themselves by listening to some music.

I'm in doubt between the PS-95, ND91 and RS100 from the dayton drivers. If I'm simply looking at the frequency response graphs, the ND91 seems to be the easiest one to work with. It even seems to be smoother than the RS100. Generally speaking, the RS-line is considered a 'better' speaker but I can't seem to find direct evidence of that in the frequency response graphs or the impedance/phase. The PS-95 is the best looking speaker but the frequency response looks just awfal. How on earth do I decide what driver to use?
Help me out!

Kind regards
 
I just received my Mini DSP HD and Umik 1 mic today. I too want to learn how to use this thing. My thoughts are the same as yours about playing with full-range drivers to start and see how it goes from there.
I have a decent stock of different FR drivers, including the PS95, TC9, ND 91, and a handful of others. I'm also going to work with my FAST setup to see what I can learn.
10F/8424 & RS225-8 FAST / WAW Ref Monitor
I'll be following this post. Thanks,
Mike
 

reinhout

Member
2017-11-24 3:29 pm
I think it's going to be up to you and me @mikejennens.

I built a soundbar with de nd65/nd25fw/nd65 (double MTM), a two-way RS150/DC28F and a salvaged sub. These were all passive speakers with a normal crossover. So I already have these to try and tweak. Maybe the PS95 is a nice one to add to it. My only concern is that up/down bump in its freq spectrum. Something tells me it's quite challenging to 'fix' it. So if you already have the PS95, feel free to update me :D
 

perceval

Member
2014-02-21 8:17 am
Taiwan
why do you want the flattest driver if you want to experiment with DSP XO and EQ?

Just get a pair to start with, even better to get them locally so it doesn't cost too much in shipping, and see how far you can push before too far is too much.

Once you learn things that you can do, and the things you really shouldn't, then look around designs available, like the 10f/225 thread that member XRK started and see which drivers people liked and the ones people were not impressed with.

Audio is a personal thing. Plenty of people either love or despise the same driver! :)
 

OllBoll

Member
2010-11-22 11:24 pm
Hello,

I want to start learning how a DSP works and what I can do with it. I'm planning on buying the dayton dsp-408 and Minidsp umik-1 as my measuring mic.

As for a driver I'm looking to buy 4 small drivers (around 100mm in diameter) so I can experiment with the placement of the speakers, eq the speakers themselves, tinker with room correction and so on. When I'm not tinkering, I would like to be able to enjoy the general quality of the speakers themselves by listening to some music.

I'm in doubt between the PS-95, ND91 and RS100 from the dayton drivers. If I'm simply looking at the frequency response graphs, the ND91 seems to be the easiest one to work with. It even seems to be smoother than the RS100. Generally speaking, the RS-line is considered a 'better' speaker but I can't seem to find direct evidence of that in the frequency response graphs or the impedance/phase. The PS-95 is the best looking speaker but the frequency response looks just awfal. How on earth do I decide what driver to use?
Help me out!

Kind regards

I have not tested the ND91 but I have tested the ND105 and it is not as smooth as other drivers I have tested. If you want a smooth 3.5 inch driver then the DMA90 is also really good. Both perform better with a tweeter though.

The SB65WBAC25, however, is a truly great driver and can be used full range as long as you don't push them too much in the bass (or use a lot of them).