Relation to wave length and speed of sound.

Sound travels approximately 343m/s right, given air temp or atmosphere as a variable. But does a particular wave length have a different arrival time to another. Say does a 100Hz wave length, compaired to 1000Hz and 10KHz arrive the same time or earlier given its a longer wave length. 100hz = 3.4m 1000 = 34cm 10000 = 3.4cm. Or does the 1KHz signal just develop or reproduce 10 times to the 100Hz single production before it reaches the listener.. ?
 
Sound travels approximately 343m/s right, given air temp or atmosphere as a variable. But does a particular wave length have a different arrival time to another. Say does a 100Hz wave length, compaired to 1000Hz and 10KHz arrive the same time or earlier given its a longer wave length. 100hz = 3.4m 1000 = 34cm 10000 = 3.4cm. Or does the 1KHz signal just develop or reproduce 10 times to the 100Hz single production before it reaches the listener.. ?

Yes they do. Look at it as air vibrations. They vibratins from a source get at the destination in the same time, independent of frequency. But with the higher freq, the number of vibrations at a particular arrival point that arrive per time unit is higher. But it takes them the same time to get from source to arrival.

jan didden
 
A simple test of that is to set a speaker on your porch, playing music. Now walk to the far end of the lawn and listen. If the music is still coherent, then all the frequencies are arriving together. If different frequencies propagated at different speeds, then the complex sound of the music would have spectrumised itself as light does traversing a prism.
 
Actually, the velocity of propagation of sound in air is a function of frequency. According to work done by the NIST and reproduced in the CRC Handbook of Physics, at 20 C and 20% RH, the VOP at 20Hz is 1127.568 ft/sec and at 20 kHz it is 1127.893 ft/sec, a difference of 0.325 ft/
sec or about 0.04%. :D

This is nearly always ignored in practice.