Record audio from mixer problem

Hi,

I am trying to record live audio from my mixer.
Please take a look at the picture I have attached so you can see what ports I have available.

I have done some research and what I know is that I need to use this cable:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Cable-Tex-3...UTF8&qid=1365778782&sr=8-6&keywords=rca+cable

and plug it into a computer to record

I understand that the cable goes into the tape out ports in the mixer but the problem is that the tape out is already being used to get the mixer to connect to this home audio system thing which then plays the audio live out of speakers.

So what is the solution?
The port is already being used, so what can I do?

Many Thanks for your help.
 

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You can simply plug into the MAIN OUT L+R XLR connectors in the top right hand corner of the desk and then run them to either the home audio system, or the computer, whichever you prefer. I would recommend running the CD/TAPE OUT to the line in of your computer and then the MAIN OUT into the home audio system.

Depending on what input connectors are used on the home audio system (they will probably be RCA/phono), you will need to buy an XLR to RCA/phono (or whatever other connector type your system inputs are on). This is wired to convert the balanced MAIN OUT (XLR's are normally used with balanced signals) to unbalanced RCA/phono. You should be able to get it from amazon too.

Hope this helps.
 
Depending on how they've wired the adaptor, those cables should work fine, though you may find you're having to run the master faders a bit low; XLRs are generally used at broadcast (+4 dBu) levels, while RCAs are normally used at domestic (-10 dBu) Alternatively, there are jack sockets in parallel with the XLRs, and jack to RCA cables should be cheaper than XLR to RCA.

Or, since the outputs are low impedance you could use a simple Y-adaptor cable, one RCA male to two females, sometimes with a bit of wire in :-http://www.amazon.de/mumbi-Verteiler-Y-Adapter-Cinch-Y-Kabel-Stecker/dp/B003RI8Y6Y/ref=pd_sxp_grid_i_0_2 , sometimes without:- Cinchverteiler Chinchverteiler Cinch Chinch Verteiler: Amazon.de: Elektronik (those pictures come from Amazon, but unfortunately Germany), which can afterwards be used for a variety of signal distribution tasks (but not for mixing stereo signals into mono).
 
Sorry, I didn't really understand that!
My knowledge of audio isn't great!!

But would the thing I said above work?

Greetings

I see what you wish to do. The RCA outputs from the mixer are the same audio content as the XLR main out OR 1/4 inch main out.

Looking at the DFX mixer block diagram from Mackie.com - I might recommend using cables to your playback/monitor audio (your stereo), with 1/4 inch MONO plug to RCA plug cables.

The reason for that is it will not only be slightly less money for these cables, instead of XLR, but mainly because the 1/4 inch main outs on this mixer are impedance balanced and the XLR main outs are "true" balanced.

An adaptor cable with XLR to RCA has to eliminate one of the "hot" connections in the XLR. XLR Pins 2 and 3 in a true balanced audio line, both have audio but are in opposite polarity. When an adapter is used to go to RCA for instance - it likely connects pin 3 to pin 1 and is shorting the audio drive on pin 3 to common.

If the XLR out was impedance balanced - pin 3 in this case would not have audio drive on that pin and is safe and ok to "short" that to common and end up with a unbalanced audio connection. It is preferred to not short out a driven output pin to common...

Going back to the block diagram, I note that the 1/4 inch main outs are derived from only one audio out of the true balanced XLR out pins.
So, this is a good way to connect the main out by 1/4 inch MONO plug to RCA. No potential harm with the mono plug in that jack because the "ring" connection on the TRS 1/4 inch plug in this output jack has no audio drive from the mixer circuitry.

If you did need to use "balanced" output from the TRS (tip, ring, sleeve) jacks, you would use a TRS plug. No need to go into the intricacies of impedance balanced theory in your application, other than the major difference of how a balanced output is achieved.
The block diagram does show a buffer amp with 2 actual, out of polarity, audio drives for the XLR outs. It is true balanced.

Again, I suggest using 1/4 inch male Mono (tip, sleeve) to RCA male adapter cables and you are good to go.

Hope this helps a little.
Carry on

Deric
 
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Really sorry to bother you!!
I didn't understand what you meant, I must stress that my knowledge of audio and mixers is weak and I have no idea what all this terminology means lol

Could you please advise me with a link, what cable I need to get and how to do it.

ManyThanks
 
Really sorry to bother you!!
I didn't understand what you meant, I must stress that my knowledge of audio and mixers is weak and I have no idea what all this terminology means lol

Could you please advise me with a link, what cable I need to get and how to do it.

ManyThanks

Ok
I guess I am allowed to put this website item from Amazon.
I personally do not use Amazon but this is an example of the cable.

Amazon.com: Live Wire RCA-1/4" Dual Patch Cable 1 Meter: Electronics

This cable will feed the audio from your mixer (1/4 inch MAIN outputs) to your stereo and could use the RCA plugs into an AUX input on your stereo.

You would continue to use the MIXER RCA jacks you have hooked to your computer already.

You will be able to listen to what is coming from the mixer with your stereo.
Keep in mind that if you are using a microphone into the mixer to record, you do not want to have the stereo in use because the audio in the room will be picked up by the mic from the stereo.

However you wish to run the mixer into the computer AND the stereo, is your choice. The mixer RCA out jacks AND the mixer MAIN out jacks have the same audio content.

I understand you are new to this, but what exactly are you wanting for an end result ?
Are you trying to record a live band from the mixer - onto the computer ?

I have a studio here at home and have done a lot of live mixing and stage performance also plus recording....
I just wanted to see what details you could provide.
 
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Hi,

Thanks for your help.

Take a look at the 2 attached photos to see my setup, as well as the picture attached in my opening post to see the mixer

This is what I need to do:

I manage the audio and video for my fathers business seminars and meetings.

I have a home audio system with 2 speakers connected, which also allows for more to be connected.

I need the audio to be played out live, I already know how to do this. But I also need a cable that will allow me to record all audio going through the mixer onto my laptop, as in it will go into the microphone port.

I have done some research and found that the port on the mixer for that is used to connect the mixer to the home audio system, you can see where it plugs into the system in the picture microphone2.

What I am asking is:

1. Could you please give me a link to a cable that I can purchase which plugs into the mixer and allows me to record the audio on a laptop.

2. Could you recommend a cheap to mid range wireless lapel mic set to use with the mixer.

That cable you linked isn't what I need I think. I need a cable that plugs somewhere into the mixer and on the other end of the cable its 3.5mm standard audio cable which can plug into the microphone port on a laptop and can be recorded with something like audacity.

Please advise - urgently, I need to order the parts today!!
 

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Hello

What you described in your "info" post explains more of what you are shooting for, in the seminar presentation.

I would suggest leaving the XLR patching, out of your solution, for the reasons I listed in my previous post.

It looks to me that you have a dual RCA cable from the mixer out - to the RCA inputs on the little stereo unit.
That is fine and you said that works, so that part is apparently ok.

Look at your mixer. Notice the 1/4 inch jacks right close to the XLR outputs. These are the 1/4 inch (Main) outputs from the mixer that has the same audio as the tape outputs, as said before.

This is where you can supply the same audio to your laptop for recording everything that comes from the mixer, as I shared previously.

The cable you can use would be a Dual 1/4 inch male MONO plugs on one end and a 3.5 mm male plug on the other end.

This is an example: Amazon.com: Hosa CMP153 Y Cable 1/8 Inch TRS to Dual 1/4 Inch TS Cable - 3 Foot: Musical Instruments

If you need longer than a 3 ft cable - then select the same ends in a longer cable...

Now the caution.
The line level coming out of the mixer at the main outs could easily be stronger than what your laptop mic input can handle, without distortion...
The mic input on the laptop is expecting a mic (low) level input.

One option is to use aux sends on the mixer, instead of the main out - to send a reduced level (by a lower setting on the aux outs) to the laptop. But I am trying to help avoid confusion in consideration of you being somewhat new to this equipment and patching stuff.

Relative levels in audio are important considerations for best performance and least distortion.

In closing, as far as a recommendation on a wireless lav unit...
There are a lot of offerings available. I am not a big fan of lavs but have certainly been involved with them countless times.

You mention low cost....

If it was possible, the ultimate solution for a wireless pack in this case - would be an earset. It is a mini condensor mic, similar to a lav but it hangs around one ear and the element is positioned near the mouth.

Example: E6 Omni Earset Mic - Countryman Associates, Inc.

These simply blow away any lav by providing a much better sound and much less feedback potential. I have convinced many users of wireless to try these and bingo - they are very pleased.
They are NOT inexpensive. They are ordered with a cable end that fits your particular wireless belt pak. So yes, you also would need a wireless pak for whatever brand or style of mic you choose, has the option of the correct connector.

Not to get deeper, but there are diversity wireless available that reduce drop outs in the RF. But that is a whole 'nother discussion. Do you know any one that you could at least borrow or rent a wireless to work with initially ??

I have a session in about 30 minutes here
Hope some of this helps

Deric
 
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Hi,
thanks for your help.

If I purchase that cable where exactly does it go into the mixer?

Based on the pic I supplied in my irst post, the xlr outs being in the top right of the mixer, where do I plug the cable you are reccomending, relative to that?

Also I didn't really understand that 2nd bit - could you please reclarify it and explain what you meant and what I have to do.


Many Thanks!
 
Hi,
thanks for your help.

If I purchase that cable where exactly does it go into the mixer?


Based on the pic I supplied in my irst post, the xlr outs being in the top right of the mixer, where do I plug the cable you are reccomending, relative to that?

Also I didn't really understand that 2nd bit - could you please reclarify it and explain what you meant and what I have to do.


Many Thanks!

Copy from previous post: Look at your mixer. Notice the 1/4 inch jacks right close to the XLR outputs. These are the 1/4 inch (Main) outputs from the mixer that has the same audio as the tape outputs, as said before.

This is where you can supply the same audio to your laptop for recording everything that comes from the mixer, as I shared previously.


The picture in your post #1 is dark where the main outs are located.

Here is the Mackie mixer manual:
http://www.mackie.com/pdf/dfx_om.pdf

On the first page of the manual (.pdf) is a picture of the mixer. Enlarge it a little and you will see a boxed off area with L+R XLR outs and 2 L+R 1/4 inch main out jacks. The jacks and XLRs have a little line between them showing they are Main outs corresponding to L and R.
Right above the headphone jack...

Regarding the "second bit"....what part do you mean specifically ?
 
hey,

thanks for your help.
I have ordered that cable as well as a set that comes with one of those condensor mics and a wireless handheld mic.

Could you clarify this:

Now the caution.
The line level coming out of the mixer at the main outs could easily be stronger than what your laptop mic input can handle, without distortion...
The mic input on the laptop is expecting a mic (low) level input.

One option is to use aux sends on the mixer, instead of the main out - to send a reduced level (by a lower setting on the aux outs) to the laptop. But I am trying to help avoid confusion in consideration of you being somewhat new to this equipment and patching stuff.

Relative levels in audio are important considerations for best performance and least distortion.



Many thanks!!!
 
hey,

thanks for your help.
I have ordered that cable as well as a set that comes with one of those condensor mics and a wireless handheld mic.

Could you clarify this:

Now the caution.
The line level coming out of the mixer at the main outs could easily be stronger than what your laptop mic input can handle, without distortion...
The mic input on the laptop is expecting a mic (low) level input.

One option is to use aux sends on the mixer, instead of the main out - to send a reduced level (by a lower setting on the aux outs) to the laptop. But I am trying to help avoid confusion in consideration of you being somewhat new to this equipment and patching stuff.

Relative levels in audio are important considerations for best performance and least distortion.

Many thanks!!!

The mic input on the laptop is a low level audio input.
When running a line level (higher) signal, like what will be on the main outs, even since it is the 1/4 inch main outs (less than the overall level on the XLR main outs), it can overload the mic input on the laptop.

There may be some ability for the laptop circuit to handle a somewhat larger signal, but if it records distorted and garbled on a trial run, try this:

Refer to the manual I provided as a link for your Mackie.

Locate and read about the "aux send" controls on each channel and the aux send master level controls.
You can use these buses to have an independently adjustable level for recording.

The same cable you are getting will also plug right into the aux send 1/4 inch jacks.

If you do go this route, please do Read The Manual and seek to grasp the overall operation of the aux sends and actually the rest of the mixer for that matter....

For starters, perhaps set each channel - aux send controls - to mid position.
Then try mid position on the aux send master controls and use the aux send outputs for your cable to the laptop.

Not to confuse you but auxes are either "pre" or "post" fader - meaning the level coming out of the aux send, on any given channel is affected by the channel slide fader if it is a "post" fader aux...
Read the manual.

Run a test on recording.
You may wish to set the aux send masters up or down - depending on the results of the test recording.

I will say it is a challenge to try to work someone through the operations of an audio mixer in a forum environment.
I do wish to assist you the best I can. Is there any one around you with some mixer experience that could help you ?
The sound classes I have taught before, cover a lot of what you are wanting to learn to do, but that was with people in the same room with me...

Experiment and gain knowledge.

Deric
 
Thanks, I will try that out!

My microphones have arrived but the set came with one of those condensor mics, wireless handheld mic and a lapel mic.

how do i maximise the amount of audio picked up by each of these as even when the gain is full its still not very loud.

please advise - many thanks
 
Thanks, I will try that out!

My microphones have arrived but the set came with one of those condensor mics, wireless handheld mic and a lapel mic.

how do i maximise the amount of audio picked up by each of these as even when the gain is full its still not very loud.

please advise - many thanks

Start by leaving the lav mic in the box.
Focus your effort on the handheld and earset style mic.

Read the manual for the wireless equipment.

What is the brand(s) and model number(s) of the wireless stuff ?

Do a search on the 'net for explanations on "Gain Structure".
Besides what is described in the Mackie mixer manual for channel input gain adjustment. And the subsequent adjustments on the mixer.

There are multiple stages of gain, starting with the wireless pack and wireless mic (internal adj for gain), into the mixer, and through the mixer, and the volume control on your audio amp/speaker system.
 

turk 182

Member
2012-10-26 3:03 pm
hey enforcer
from the pictures you supplied i am left wondering a few things first is the mixer on (powered up) and secondly why are all the unused channels turned up to max as well as the masters this is not good mixer practice as it simply adds noise to your mix that your trying to record!
you didn't include pic's of your speakers are they stand mounted? which to me would be a must to do business presentations.
what is on the other end of that mic line that's patched into channel 1?
 
Too quiet with the 'gain' potentiometer on the Mackie wound flat out, or too qiet when compared to the others with equivalent settings? Yes, you're likely to have less gain and more room sound on the lapel mic; it's omnidirectional, so picks up everything, and is not optimally placed for voice pick up. It'll also probably require lots more equalisation to sound decent. But that's just typical of that style of microphone.

You haven't given model numbers for the microphones, but some of those body pack transmitters give gain trimmers – generally screwdriver adjust mini potentiometers, occasionally DIL switches – and set them pretty low on delivery, because they don't want them to distort on loud signals. Don't adjust anything like this unless you've read about it in the manual; sometimes they're channel select. Look for preset gain, input gain, input pad, anything like that.