Professional Engineer Exam

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Took the civil exam many years ago in California. It requires a lot of study to pass it. The difficult part for a lot of people is the seismic element. The test is a lot harder now than it was in the 1980's. Still recommend civil to anyone. An MS degree is important now days.
 
I did algebra class in high school. I did trigonometry and calculus in electrical school some years back. I do work with a lot of electrical at work and reading schematics to figure out issues not all the time but a lot. I wonder if taking the test is worth it to further my degree and education in this field? I would hope I would get a raise as well at work? Jeff
 
The professional engineers’ exam is very much not an easy one. Lots of practical experience really doesn’t help. The tests are mostly written by college professors with more state of the art rather than practical experience.

The last one I took about 40 years ago was greatly aided by an unofficial study guide. The official aides were not very useful. In the exam room there were about 20 other folks. Some had spent four years of study. Some were on their third try!

After I finished the tests, I was told I passed and asked to wait in another room while the proctors finished their work. After a bit one came out, finished with me and I left. I did not see anyone else pass.

If you pass the EIT test and then the PE test most states will accept your qualifications. If just the PE segment, then most likely only the state where you took the test will consider you a PE.

In my first college EE test, I thought I had aced it. I was surprised when I only got 84%. I mentioned to John a classmate that I had an 84 and inquired how he did. He told me 100%. Next asked Harry and his response was the same. The thought occurred that I might flunk out.

Then the instructor started the class. He mentioned welcome to college and although to get here you had to be tops in your class, this was going to require much more work. The class average on the first test was 29%! It would have been lower except one joker got 84%! Welcome to the university!

So you might want to try the test and see how well you actually do, can’t hurt.
 
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The EIT (Engineer In Training) test was taken after completion of a four year engineering program. The PE (Professional Engineer) was a test given no sooner than 4 years later, loosely based on specific real world engineering experience....that test involved HVAC systems, pumps, compressors, boilers, piping, engineering economics, the whole shebang....but my work experience at the time of PE test really only dealt with a few of those topics....so I was a bit disadvantaged...

Passing the EIT was required for graduation back in '87 at University of Illinois. It was easy...

But I had to take the PE, twice.... Failed my first time... the Mechanical Engineering PE had a less than 30% pass rate back then, and staying out all night partying the night before did not help...second test went more smoothly, as I was better prepared and took a class....

But my PE license was never really utilized in my line of work. Had I been on consulting side instead of client side, it would have made a world of difference. Co-workers actually laughed at me for even having that PE....

In Illinois, an engineering company cannot have the word "Engineering" in the company name unless owner / principle has aquired a PE license...
 
Most of my clients company are from the US and Eastern Europe, most of there employees claim to be engineers but don’t seem to know the difference between an engineer and a professional engineer, in Canada you are either a technician or a professional engineer. To legally call yourself an engineer you need to be a professional engineer. I find that the professional engineer title is used very lightly in many businesses, most of the so called engineer have never been to university…
 
Then the instructor started the class. He mentioned welcome to college and although to get here you had to be tops in your class, this was going to require much more work. The class average on the first test was 29%! It would have been lower except one joker got 84%! Welcome to the university!
Happened to me only once, in calculus 2nd term. I didn't have it in high school, and it took an entire semester to click, but when it engaged, it really engaged. I don't know why, but I sailed through another 3 terms of calc.

My undergrad alma mater does not have an engineering school, but they have an engineering physics major with a very strong emphasis on physics. The graduates have been doing extremely well in the job market, about half go on to get their masters and a couple doctorates.

I could never have been an engineer or an accountant, could never sit still in class. My grandson was "absented" from Montessori school two weeks ago for being "disruptive at nap-time"....
 
The Professional Engineer (PE) designation (at least in the USA) is required for engineers required to sign off on designs that affect public safety such as buildings, bridges, power plants and power transmission. If you expect to be involved in any of those (or maybe a few more I don't know about) a PE would be beneficial, otherwise a BS degree should be sufficient for an "engineering" career. The PE requires good knowledge of several fields of engineering, not just EE. You need a BS degree in engineering before taking the PE.
 
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Here the four year college course gets you a Bachelor's in Engineering (or Technology), and after that there is a Chartered Engineer's exam, you get a MIE (Member of Institute of Engineers) after clearing that.

That exam has a wider field than the regular college courses, basically you are a consultant inspecting a job, so the machine / plant comes into view, not just the process.
Civil, Electrical, Mechanical, safety, other aspects need to be covered in your reports.

You can also get an AMIE, either by applying as a degree holder, or give the exam after a 3 year diploma course (which you can join after 10th grade), the Government here considers it equal to BE, so holders get enhanced responsibilities fitting their education.

After practising as an engineer (MIE) for five years, you can stand for election, the senior members decide whether you become FIE, which is Fellow.
After that, you can be a legal certifying engineer / surveyor, your reports have legal standing.

A similar approach exists for students clearing the five year Architecture course. They have an Institute of Architects, their designs and plans are eligible for inspection and clearance by the town planning authorities.

In sum, there is a difference between a regular engineer and a certifying engineer, which is called PE in your area.
Some colleges offer part time or evening courses in engineering, for those who have jobs and so on.

BE / B.Tech. is equal to American BS degree.
ME / M.Tech. is equivalent to American MS degree, post graduate coure in Engineering or Technology.
 
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Same here in Canada, all engineering degrees (P. Eng.) will be given to you after successfully completing 40 courses over a 4 year program.
Oh, that seems as though something has changed. It used to be that a graduate had to wait five years of documented workplace experience after completion of their undergraduate degree before admittance to write the P.Eng exam. Graduates having a master’s degree could write it immediately. Persons without a formal degree could also challenge the exam at the recommendation of an engineer.
 
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Most engineering degrees are a 4 year program involving midterms and papers, so that would be 4x2x 5 courses or 40 exams and at maybe 8 papers.
Same here in Canada, all engineering degrees (P. Eng.) will be given to you after successfully completing 40 courses over a 4 year program.
Here, I remember having undergone some 58 courses over 4 years to get my basic EE degree (B. Tech.)
 
Last time I paid attention a PE was based on the state where you were working. The standards were not national! The tests were done by an independent organization pretty much on a national basis.

I was told in one state as soon as you finished your last year at the state college, the entire graduating class was taken to the state PE licensing office where they took a test, had it stamped “approved” and then given their license!
 
I also have the impression that you need five years' standing as a practising engineer to be able to get the FIE, which is the name for Chartered Engineer (or PE) here.
But like above, the procedures differ...

I have a similar thought about medical education here, the South Indians are much smarter.
The surgeons in Mumbai do short cut surgeries for DBS, targeting a larger area called the GPi, they say it is difficult to target the STN!
The STN is only 0.3 cc in volume, but the South Indians do it routinely, taking 3 instead of 6 hours...

So if I knew that PE was handed out without formal training in the various apects of the respobsibilities, I would check and see if the college really did have the training in place for all students, and the reputation of the institute, as reflected by the quality of the alumni.
It is like a chiropractor, they need a medical degree in the USA to practise.
 
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I wasn’t very precise in my description. It’s been a while…
Once your 4 years engineering program is done you are an EIT for a period of 2 years. A senior P.Eng will be assigned to you and at the end based on his recommendations you will then be asked to take a deontology course and exam. Once all done you can then sign P. Eng. (if needed)
Sorry if I wasn’t clear, I went through these steps more then 20 years ago..😀
 
The Professional Engineer (PE) designation (at least in the USA) is required for engineers required to sign off on designs that affect public safety such as buildings, bridges, power plants and power transmission. If you expect to be involved in any of those (or maybe a few more I don't know about) a PE would be beneficial, otherwise a BS degree should be sufficient for an "engineering" career. The PE requires good knowledge of several fields of engineering, not just EE. You need a BS degree in engineering before taking the PE.
BS doesn’t get you much these days. To work in a field or position where you make a difference (or are not just expendable) they want an MS. 10 years experience would also work, but if youre stuck in Siberia (that’s what we call it) it’s hard to stand out and get noticed. PE/no PE doesnt seem to matter. And they want you to publish, publish, publish. I would have gotten a Ph.D and a post-doc if I wanted to do that and travel around to conferences with all my free time.