Poor air quality...

Cough……wheezzzeee….


I thought the air quality in the Tenn valley was bad and then I came to California. It is an amazing thing, the ignorance out here. All the expense and laws against vehicle emissions and all this hoopla about hybrid and electric vehicles…..then the same people every night with a wood fire going in their homes spewing out carcinogenic smoke. What’s with these people? I drive through Napa valley and Marin County and every other house has a smoke stack billowing out a continuous stream of toxins. It is evident from the amount of smoke coming from their chimneys that most of them have no idea how to actually build a fire. A proper fire should not smoke. Smoke is unburned fuel. If only you could slap some sense into these people! In the hotel I’m staying at my heater is off. It’s fri'ggin Dec. The weather is supposed to be cool, even here. Everyone around me has their heaters cranked up and my room is still hotter than the fiery gates of hell. I open my door to vent the excess heat only to be choked out by smoke from some as$ hole's chimney.:mad: REEEEEDICULOUS:cuss::whazzat:

I grew up loving fire, a pyro of sorts, mostly because life in a small WV town is boring, but I was always interested in how to make the fire better, i. e. more efficient. My fires don’t smoke much because I know how to build it. A wood fireplace requires constant shifting of the wood in order to achieve the most clean combustion and heat from it. It also requires the proper fuel. I can tell by the stink of the smoke around here that people are burning green pine, green as in unseasoned. If your wood has been cut for less than 8-12 months, you’re burning green wood. Pine, especially green pine, is the worst. It is full of oils that clog up the flew with soot and chokes out everyone around it with horrible smoke. >1 year seasoned Oak or even Poplar is the best as are a few other types of wood. These woods are very dense so they burn longer and require less attention but still must be split into small pieces to burn in an open fireplace.

I envision an automated stove system that uses wood chips or pellets with a forced air combustion chamber that draws in air from outside into the stove, with a reasonalbly smart control system with oxygen sensors ect, like a modern car engine. The stove not only has a blower that recycles inside air and radiators from the flew pipe but also heats a boiler that transports the heat via steam to the rest of the house. Imagine how little amount of wood you would have to burn to heat a fairly large home or building? Maintenance would be minimal and efficiency would be high but most importantly, it would not billow out constant streams of smoke and pollution! All these environmental laws but nothing agains this crap.:whacko: It just goes to show that when it comes down to the bottom dollar and nostalgia, even the most, so called, environmentalistic people really don’t care…..that or they really are just plain ignorant.


Cough…..wheez……..

*end rant*
 
Ain't life grand? I run the AC all summer long, just waiting for the first 65 degree nights to come along so I can flush the house with a cheap low power box fan.. and some nutter across the street thinks he has to have himself a fire in the fireplace already. And they gotta start a pile of logs with newspaper and hardly any kindling. so you get some thick white smoke all through the neighborhood for half an hour. If you don't happen to be home to catch it right away yer screwed. The whole house smells like a chimney all night.

:(
 
Kinda makes you a fan of Natural gas, eh? And I don't mean the gas after a chili eating contest.:D I only wish Natural gas was not so corporatized so it was affordable. Get this, in WV and all throughout the Appalachians Natural gas is coming out of people’s ears. Mining companies exhaust it to the air to get rid of it because of the hazards. Yet Columbia gas exports the same gas from wells there to Arizona, then pipes it back to WV and sells it to the customers there at top rate prices. Something is wrong with that picture.......I'm sure the name Rockefeller rings a bell.......

Anyway, with all the money and infrastructure in Cali, you would think the people here would take advantage of this clean burning fuel, at least compared to a wood fire that the fire burner knows not how to use properly. My father lives is Unicoi Tenn which is about as backwoods as most people care to trek, yet he has natural gas piped to the house. Something I must be missing here.

Holy mackrel...

off subject distraction........

WOW, I just discovered the Victoria Secret fashon show is on CBS, soft core porn on national cable TV......public degeneracy at its best.....:tongue:
 
I can't stand wood smoke and I've heated 100% with wood for 15 years. Seasoned hardwood only, and a low emission stove that does a secondary burn of the emissions. I can't claim it's perfect- it's only as good as the fire builder, but in general you won't find a huge stink around my house- at least not related to the wood stove! The big hoopla around here now is about the big outdoor woodburning furnaces. Those tend to be very high emission and poorly operated.

CH
 

Pano

Administrator
Paid Member
2004-10-07 6:05 am
Panama
When I lived in San Fran we has gas central heat, gas hot water, gas stove, gas clothes dryer. Big house on Fulton street.

Our electric bill was always higher than the gas. Go figure.

I've heated with wood (farmhouse) and will say "No, Thank You" to that.
 
Is this connected to the wood problem? Of course, this is not an excuse for a poor burning fire. Personally I've always liked the smell of a good coal fire.

Tier system started June 2001.
Base quantity = 290.4 Kwh = .118
101 to 130% = 87.1 Kwh = .135
131-200% = 203.2 Kwh = .290
201 % of base up = .40 cent / Kwh (the top tier dropped from 49.8 Kwh to .40 in March.


Base quantity = 14.88 therms @ 1.054
Over baseline = 1.336


Are these high?
 

Pano

Administrator
Paid Member
2004-10-07 6:05 am
Panama
I thought you were a romantic. I like looking at burning wood and love eating roasted chestnuts too.

Yes, I am. And also love a wood fire. But cutting all that firewood is a lot of work. And the smell is all over everything. Not bad when you live and work on a farm, - the cows and sheep don't seem to mind - but not great when you live in the city - the coworkers do mind. ;)

Are there any of you here old enough to remember London before the Clean Air Act of 1956? I wasn't there, but have been told by those who remember that the fog was awful. The real pea soup variety. One fellow I knew said that as a boy he had often lost his way crossing the road!


After the Clean Air Act, the famous "fog" lifted.
 
Is this connected to the wood problem?
Tier system started June 2001.
Base quantity = 290.4 Kwh = .118
101 to 130% = 87.1 Kwh = .135
131-200% = 203.2 Kwh = .290
201 % of base up = .40 cent / Kwh (the top tier dropped from 49.8 Kwh to .40 in March.


Base quantity = 14.88 therms @ 1.054
Over baseline = 1.336

Are these high?

Wait and see what happens when you plug in your electric vehicle for a recharge - or telecommute while at home (running the computer, lights, etc. on your dime).

I was the company air resources officer in Sacramento when I lived there - not an easy task.

People in the Central Valley of California were required to purchase "pellet" wood burning stoves several years ago - around 2000 or so and that should have happened in the Bay Area as well. All new wood burning stoves and new construction houses must use them if they have a wood burning fireplace. The regulation was grandfathered tho - if ya had an old fire place you could still use it - but come time for a replacement and a pellet stove was in your future.
 
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