Need some help please....Mac user...

motrctyman

Member
2013-02-05 4:07 pm
Greetings all.

After an almost 10 year hiatus, I am back and getting the itch to build some more speakers. :D

Something strange has happened since then...I now do not own a Windows machine. Two Macbook Pro's, and two iMacs, but nothing else. The tools I used to use a lot were Winisd, Weems's TQWP (which does not jive with Mac's spreadsheet), and hornresp. :confused:

Does anyone have any suggestions? Thanks in advance.
 
Greetings all.

After an almost 10 year hiatus, I am back and getting the itch to build some more speakers. :D

Something strange has happened since then...I now do not own a Windows machine. Two Macbook Pro's, and two iMacs, but nothing else. The tools I used to use a lot were Winisd, Weems's TQWP (which does not jive with Mac's spreadsheet), and hornresp. :confused:

Does anyone have any suggestions? Thanks in advance.

contact Dave Dlugos via the Planet10 site email
 
WINE is OK and Crossover is a bit better, but not worth the money IMO.

Boot camp is an option, but rebooting into Windblows every time becomes tedious.

The best (free) option is to install Oracle VM Virtualbox and then install whatever version of Windows you want in that. https://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Downloads

It allows you to run both OS's simultaneously (one natively, one in a virtual machine) which prevents having to reboot all the time and allows access to the apps on both OSs at the same time. It is dead simple to use, and you can in fact create and run as many VMs as your computer can handle (try Linux too! :) )

Here's what OS X looks like running Windows 7 in a virtual machine:
mac_os_x.png


Note: I am a long-time Linux user and have used all of the discussed solutions to run various Windows apps. By far the most issue-free experience (for me) is running Windows in a VM. Wherever possible, of course, I simply try to find alternatives to the Windows app, but as we know that is not always possible.
 
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Note: I am a long-time Linux user and have used all of the discussed solutions to run various Windows apps. By far the most issue-free experience (for me) is running Windows in a VM. Wherever possible, of course, I simply try to find alternatives to the Windows app, but as we know that is not always possible.

I am also a 12+ years only Linux user, and windows NT4 was my last version of windows. Windows of any version scares me as I have no idea how to debug avoid trouble with windows. I fully agree with this, but winISD does run just fine under wine.

Since wine is mostly developed under Linux it may not be quiet as nice under MacOS X. Since MacOS X is mostly freeBSD from an API perspective "wine", will probably not be much worse.

Using a VM may be easier though if you dont know how to use a UNIX command line and can put up with "installing windows for the first time" messages.
 
I am also a 12+ years only Linux user, and windows NT4 was my last version of windows. Windows of any version scares me as I have no idea how to debug avoid trouble with windows. I fully agree with this, but winISD does run just fine under wine.

Since wine is mostly developed under Linux it may not be quiet as nice under MacOS X. Since MacOS X is mostly freeBSD from an API perspective "wine", will probably not be much worse.

Using a VM may be easier though if you dont know how to use a UNIX command line and can put up with "installing windows for the first time" messages.

Indeed, WinISD does run perfectly in WINE. In fact, that is how I run it, just for the convenience of not having to boot the Windows VM. Not sure about other box design apps, though. Having a Windows VM is handy for other things though, like when I need to provide friends/family with "Remote Assistance" on their messed up Windows machines, or run something that doesn't work easily in WINE.
 
VirtualBox is just as good (arguably better) and free?

I don't know about that. I never got VB to work, and the Parallels i have installed just work. The autosuck is worth the entry price if you want/need to suck up an existing PC into your Mac.

And just having gone thru it, Parallels is an easier Windozs install than Boot Camp.

dave
 
Odd, I've been using Virtualbox for a long time on various OSs (with various guest OSs) and never had any issue.

On the other hand, I only owned a Mac for about 8 hours, so perhaps there is something very troublesome about running VB on OS X, of which I am not aware.

Either way, I think the OP has a lot of options to explore. :)
 
Odd, I've been using Virtualbox for a long time on various OSs (with various guest OSs) and never had any issue.

On the other hand, I only owned a Mac for about 8 hours, so perhaps there is something very troublesome about running VB on OS X, of which I am not aware.

Either way, I think the OP has a lot of options to explore. :)

One rather straightforward solution is to buy a $200 Windows PC netbook to run sims in. :)
 
Can anyone run MJK's worksheets on Mcad in a virtual pc within a Mac? I couldn't do it even in a virtual Windows XP PC running in a Windows 7 x64 and had to end up getting a full blown new copy of Mcad 15 because earlier Mcad versions are incompatible with Windows 7 and higher.

Windows XP VM on my Linux workstation. MathCAD "Explorer" and the "test worksheet" (as per Martin's instructions on his site) runs perfectly. It couldn't have been any easier, in fact. Shouldn't matter what the host OS is. That's the whole point of a virtual machine. The guest OS has no idea it is virtualized and acts no differently than a "real computer".

However, I have no idea WTF to do with the worksheets. :D
 
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Windows XP VM on my Linux workstation. MathCAD "Explorer" and the "test worksheet" (as per Martin's instructions on his site) runs perfectly. It couldn't have been any easier, in fact. Shouldn't matter what the host OS is. That's the whole point of a virtual machine. The guest OS has no idea it is virtualized and acts no differently than a "real computer".

However, I have no idea WTF to do with the worksheets. :D
Linux works but what about macs?
If you are willing to run Windows in a virtual machine, what is the objection to running it on hardware designed for it? I don't want to get into a mac vs pc discussion here but, there are a lot of science and engineering tools on the pc that are not available on the mac.

In principal, that is what virtualization is supposed to do, but not my experience as Mathcad (full version) requires FlexIM manager and root access and it wants to know it is on a hard machine to avoid piracy.
 
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