• WARNING: Tube/Valve amplifiers use potentially LETHAL HIGH VOLTAGES.
    Building, troubleshooting and testing of these amplifiers should only be
    performed by someone who is thoroughly familiar with
    the safety precautions around high voltages.

Need Schematic for this GE Console fast.

I just scored my 2nd of these GE consoles and haven't had a chance to get a schematic for them. My order for some other parts from ApexJR will ship tomorrow and now I have a appetite to get these also re-capped. So I need the schematic ASAP if anyone has one so I can add the parts.

It was manufactured April 22, 1960 and runs on 7355 output tubes

Here are some pics.
 
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GOt it pic upload to work!

getting;

"Your submission could not be processed because a security token was missing.

If this occurred unexpectedly, please inform the administrator and describe the action you performed before you received this error."

The link to inform the admin does not work.

I've rebooted and logged off and back on DIYAUDIO and cleared my cache. What else can I do?

Doesn't work from IE either (I was using Chrome originally)

BUT!!!! if I upload a .jpg not a .bmp, it works!!??
 

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Good questions...

Yes, definitely needs a vacume!!

Both of them work and fortunately when that was demonstrated to me, nothing smoked or died. Of course, before seeing power again, the coupling and PS filter caps will be replaced (the main goal of this thread).

I will have 2 of these. Between the 2 of them, I could make a pretty pristine one, so right now my goal is to;
- both have 7025 based mono "reverb" units in them in addition to the main power amp. I will pull the mono amps and maybe make monoblocks out of them.
- pull one power amp and make a free standing amp
- restore and modernize the cab and insides of the other. I plan to leave the tuner in, remove the turntable and replace it with a touch screen, and add a motherboard with wireless wifi to pull digital music off my media center, internet, etc. It will look original from the outside.

Thoughts?
 
Thoughts?

Sounds like a plan.

Most of these old consoles didn't have fuses anywhere. When the can caps dry up, the power supply cooks. Surprisingly, I've never heard of one catching fire.

I'd start by installing a fuse and grounded plug.

You can read the values right off the side of those can caps, even if you can't find a schematic. AES sells them.
 
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Sounds like a plan.

Most of these old consoles didn't have fuses anywhere. When the can caps dry up, the power supply cooks. Surprisingly, I've never heard of one catching fire.

I'd start by installing a fuse and grounded plug.

You can read the values right off the side of those can caps, even if you can't find a schematic. AES sells them.

Greetings all

Seeing the photos provided in post #4 in this thread brought back memories from some time ago. My father owned a GE television and appliance store performing sales and service for many years. Of course I grew up around this environment and began to service radio, stereo and general amplifier repair at age 12. And in a couple years progressed into television repair as a tech.

This model being discussed is very similar to repairs I was involved with, and a 1960 model was only 13 years old when I would have been into these console stereos.

I do not recall any lack of fuse protection in these, in spite of being decades back in time for me. In the photos in post #4 - it shows the chassis sticker regarding fuse replacement....
I don't believe Underwriters Laboratories (UL), would approve a consumer device like this without a fuse.

Only in the last few years, since my father passed away, did the large binders of schematics and service information hit the dumpster. I was not involved in the trashing of all the vintage info and couple thousand NOS tubes that was stored in the basement of the original location of his retail business. It still makes me ill thinking of the loss that included NOS valves from even back in the 30's and 40's....

I am certain this model would have been included in these files, but I can't retrieve what is gone.

Without a doubt, any of the electrolytics in any of the circuitry in this console are likely a bit dry. So the plan to replace them is a good idea.
We had normally used an air compressor to blow out dust buildup in all the repair jobs. I know that has pluses and minuses regarding dust blowing around...

I wish you well on your project here. I know I would enjoy diving into it even without the factory service data...

Carry on
Deric
 
More info from another link. Still not enough info tho

Here is a link to one like mine.

Antique Radio Forums • View topic - Help with General Electric Tube amp console...

In it there is a pic of a ID tag that implies its a "RC-1710R", or "RC-1711R" or "RC-1714R" depending upon wood construction. Mine is Walnut, so would be a RC-1711R per the tag.

There is also a shot of some Sam's info, but no actual schematic or actual component value data.

Tom-

Hopefully this is enough info for you to find my schematic. <Crossed_fingers>.
 
More info, but no answer yet...

I picked up the 2nd General Electric console today and i still ad the model number tag on the back.

It says;
RC-1350A
RC-1351A
RC-1354A

Each means a different wood cab, so I'm sure the insides are the same.

So still looking for a schematic. Maybe the above will sound familiar to someone.

P.S. if you didn't read from the top, I now have 2 of these and no schematic to use for a rebuild.

Thanks for any help you can provide!