Minimum amplifier power question

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I'd ignore any "minimum amplifier power requirement". Most of the time, you'll run at less than a watt, assuming the speakers are reasonably efficient.

You won't run into any problems running 25w a side, unless, of course, you clip the amplifier.

Which speakers are you looking at?
 
Minimum amp power recommendations are usually there to avoid the amp clipping in normal(ish) listening conditions.
Personally I like to use amps capable of twice the output of the maximum(!) amp power recommended by the speaker manufacturer.
The Tannoys I use are capable of taking 125w and Tannoy recommended amps between 125 and 300w in the tech manual.
Bear in mind that if you listen at 90dBspl average that there will be peaks of 102dBspl or even more (depending on the music you listen to) and the amp should be capable of producing the required power cleanly.
Most tweeters die due to to small an amp that is clipping during loud passages.
 
Minimum amp power recommendations are usually there to avoid the amp clipping in normal(ish) listening conditions.

That probably works ok in the home.

In a disco or band situation the guys will always want it louder so they will turn up the amp to full throttle. So a high power amp on lesser powered speakers will fry every time.

I worked for an audio company for a while and i was permanently kept busy replacing fried speakers and tweeters.
 
A company I worked for rented part of their warehouse to a PA hire company.
They used amps capable of twice the power of what the drivers would take. That was very reliable but then their gigs were large enough that none of the musicians would ever get close to an amp rack or would even want to.
Can't trust DJs though as they tend to overdrive their little mixers and once the waveform is clipped it is just a matter of time before the tweeter fries.
 
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Minimum amp power recommendations are usually there to avoid the amp clipping in normal(ish) listening conditions.
Personally I like to use amps capable of twice the output of the maximum(!) amp power recommended by the speaker manufacturer.
The Tannoys I use are capable of taking 125w and Tannoy recommended amps between 125 and 300w in the tech manual.
Bear in mind that if you listen at 90dBspl average that there will be peaks of 102dBspl or even more (depending on the music you listen to) and the amp should be capable of producing the required power cleanly.
Most tweeters die due to to small an amp that is clipping during loud passages.

What is "Clipping" the DM2000's have built in protection circuit that limits maximum power regardless of input power.
 
Almost al the power is needed to reproduce the low frequency.

with a speaker who reproduces 90dB 1W/mtr will probably run below 1 W when youre listening because 90 dB is already loud.

Compare it to a little transistor radio. Those are about 100mW with low efficiency loudspeaker. And they are loud enough to listen to in a normal room even at playing with medium level. So what I want to explain the main level we are listening to will be in the mW area.

When you want loud subbase then you need serious power.
 
I would say 10W is enough al thats more is nice.

For every extra 3dB sound level you need to double the power. To play 3 dB louder then 10W you need 20W. To play again 3 dB louder you need 40W so you see the gain in sound level above 10 W becomes increasing lower.

But it is nice to have some reserve power for peaks in the music.
 
Almost al the power is needed to reproduce the low frequency.

with a speaker who reproduces 90dB 1W/mtr will probably run below 1 W when youre listening because 90 dB is already loud.

Compare it to a little transistor radio. Those are about 100mW with low efficiency loudspeaker. And they are loud enough to listen to in a normal room even at playing with medium level. So what I want to explain the main level we are listening to will be in the mW area.

When you want loud subbase then you need serious power.

Even then, 50w a side into some 98dB@1w PA speakers (1x12" per side) was sufficient to hit you in the chest and rattle things from the other side of a medium sized auditorium. When it's that loud, you legally have to wear hearing protection over here. There's many tables saying how loud for how long it can be, before you'll get hearing damage.

A cheap SPL meter will tell all. I listen around 70dB, meaning my 93dB@1w Fostexes are cruising at around 1/400 of a watt *each*. My subwoofer, however, requires considerably more... About half a watt.

Chris
 
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