Metalwork tips and tricks for Cabinetry.

PRR

Member
Paid Member
2003-06-12 7:04 pm
Maine USA
everyone has WD40 around...
I don't.

Diesel is cheaper than Kerosene...
Cheaper yet if you can get "Off-Road" (untaxed) oil. The big fuel stop here has a separate pump. The staff is supposed to harass you for putting it in the side of your regular pickup, but never blinked at my 5-gallon can.

Kerosene is more the lighter fractions. Heat/Diesel has heavier fractions, a little thicker, a little harder to light-off.

WD-40, is kerosene, and was supposed to be "deodorized", and I've smelled worse fuel-oil, but the smell is one of the reasons I won't keep it in the house.

Drilling small holes in the garage, you can get enough drips of 10-30 oil off your car dipstick to do sheetmetal.

Chainsaw lube is sticky, thus effective, and, here, a necessity.
 
I don't.


Cheaper yet if you can get "Off-Road" (untaxed) oil. The big fuel stop here has a separate pump. The staff is supposed to harass you for putting it in the side of your regular pickup, but never blinked at my 5-gallon can.

Kerosene is more the lighter fractions. Heat/Diesel has heavier fractions, a little thicker, a little harder to light-off.

WD-40, is kerosene, and was supposed to be "deodorized", and I've smelled worse fuel-oil, but the smell is one of the reasons I won't keep it in the house.

Drilling small holes in the garage, you can get enough drips of 10-30 oil off your car dipstick to do sheetmetal.

Chainsaw lube is sticky, thus effective, and, here, a necessity.
WD40 is fish oil, or hydrocarbons derived from fish oil, so I was always told.

Kerosene, is slightly more difficult to obtain. I don't fly, so no easy source I know of.
Probably the closest I would get would be lighter fluid

I could always pinch a couple oz of diesel from SWMBO car, but if I am honest, I think I would be happy never to smell diesel again.
 

PRR

Member
Paid Member
2003-06-12 7:04 pm
Maine USA
Kerosene, is slightly more difficult to obtain. I don't fly,
Fly?? Kerosene is for low-tech heaters. Here it is distinctly different than jet fuel. It was tractor fuel until Diesels became common.

The names of the various fractions of crude oil, naphtha, paraffin, petroleum oil, benzine, etcetc, vary between countries.

FWIW, I am wrong a LOT.
 
Fly?? Kerosene is for low-tech heaters. Here it is distinctly different than jet fuel. It was tractor fuel until Diesels became common.

Sorry I associate Kerosene with aviation. Its use is such, here in the UK, to the best of my knowledge.

Paraffin was used for heating here.
Heating fuel oil however, is a totally different thing.
Much much heavier fraction.

Tractors have been diesel or I guess just about any waste oil you can think of, until recent years.

I have some Naptha, but I don't fancy trying that! (I don't think Acetone would be clever either)

Still to try the Meths/ethanol, but isopropanol was not quite as good to use, compared to WD40. But nicer to clean up!
FWIW, I am wrong a LOT.
Nah.....
 

PRR

Member
Paid Member
2003-06-12 7:04 pm
Maine USA
Heating fuel oil however,
Here, recently, #2 Home Heat and Diesel fuel are the exact same thing except the tax and dye. Road Diesel is better stuff than the crud we used to buy as #2 Home, but it turned out to be just as cheap to process it all to the same standard, save inventory and tankage. Jet fuel is different b/c it has to meet temperature extremes and has different additives.

US heating kerosene, also used in lanterns, is thinner and easier to ignite. In home heat grade it is highly refined to reduce stink.

Naphtha/gasoline is even easier to ignite. "Naphtha" means different things on different markets, from car fuel to paint thinner to muscle-rub. In the US in 1915 they were the same, but only a small % of the barrel of crude. As electric lights displaced lanterns and cars drank all they could get, more kerosene got mixed into gasoline. This is when/why we got heated intake manifolds to break-up and vaporize heavy fractions, but cracking eventually developed to turn any available fraction into almost any other desired fraction.