Man Cave. Let's see yours.

This was mine. The tubes (amp/preamp and CD player) have been replaced by a digital amp and iPad. I still love the sound and have less clutter because I'm streaming.

Eminence 12LTA (wide range driver running full out) plus Eminence ASD 1001 tweeter (using Dayton waveguide - cap value is 1.17uf for a seamless blend) sitting on top of an Eminence Alpha 15 H-frame powered by a 100 watt Dayton subwoofer amp. This all OB system doesn't break the bank, is 97db per watt and has impact and clarity most full range systems can't match. Not for the faint of heart.
 

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It's a 3.0 SC, but it does have a Stereo on board, even a subwoofer in the smugglers box.

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That Genesis Series III amp is for the tweeters (2x Viva XT25 SC90), a bigger 4 channel is under the passenger seat.

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I used 3D printing to make my own design tweeter pods. A Pioneer radio takes care of active x-over and time alignment. Not exactly full range though ;), more a 2 way plus sub system. The Pioneer kit under the amp is a USB connector for the radio to be able to play everything from a thumb drive (you can see the thumb drive upper left in the console). This system was the reason for me to build my line arrays. This Stereo beat what I had in the living room in every way.

But that flat six does play a really nice tune all by itself!

More here: 1982 Porsche 911 first build, simple system
 
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Yep :D, it would be...

IIRC the 3.0 is one of the rarer 911s around these days -and one of the most underrated. Nice job.:) Closest I'll ever get to owning a Porsche was a few blasts in a little 914 (not exactly fast, but a lovely little motor).

The 3.0 from before 78 is the more rare one (it has a magnesium engine case, just like the '73 RS). All 911 SC's were also 3.0 but not that rare though (aluminum case). The US version had 180 HP, the Euro version (like mine) had 204 HP. The exhaust should give 15 to 20 HP more though, it was noticeable when I swapped out the old one for that RVS header. The SC has the name of being the "bullet proof engine" with their mechanical K-jetronic. That's why I got that one. Lucky for me the price has only gone up since I bought it more than 10 years ago. It's my daily driver :eek:. I don't believe in garage queens...
 
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Dave R

Member
2006-08-09 5:30 am
Dave's Cave

I have 2 setups. The outer pair of TMM's are powered by the HT receiver. These are for daily listening, including tv. Vent/box tuning right about 42 Hz.

For quality "Dave time", I use the little black bookshelf speakers, powered by a SE tube amp. They are sitting on top of a pair of TH subs, which use Anarchy 7" drivers, and are powered by their own plate amps. A miniDSP is used as a low pass to eliminate the nastiness in the TH response above 100 hz. The TH subs are flat down to around 27 Hz, and crossover around 65 Hz to the bookshelf speakers.

To the right of the tube amp is a voltage divider that is used for headphones.

All of the speakers and the tube amp are diy. The tube amp and the TH subs were kits. Samsung 42" HDTV, Oppo BDP-105, Denon AVR-888 HT receiver, Sennheiser HD600.

It is my domain in one end of the garage, but the wife helped with the furnishings and décor. Adjacent to the cave is a shop space where I can make sI hope she keeps me. :D
 

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It is still very much a work in progress.

In Florida I had everything, listening room, lab, shop, storage, and music room all stuffed into a 10 X 10 foot room. I even rebuilt a couple of transmissions, and a 4 cylinder automobile engine in there.

When my 41 year career ended, I did the reverse of what many people do when they "retire." I packed up everything and moved up north.

After moving twice, we are settling in to a newly constructed house. It has about 2,000 square feet of empty basement and my mission is to make good use of at least half of that space.

Picture 1. The beginning, a big empty cave with a 240 volt 200 amp electrical panel on the far wall.

Picture 2. Some carpet left behind by the builder is randomly tossed on the floor, along with some hard rubber for the gym area. I plan to do something better when time and funds are available. First workbench being built from scraps left by the home builder.

Picture 3. First bench mostly finished, bench top covered with laminate flooring samples acquired from a failed carpet shop. Second bench under construction, studio desk bought from Guitar Center and partly set up.

Picture 4. Real DIY audio stuff beginning to take place.

Picture 5. Studio desk has two computers and most of an audio system. Still using $20 Parts Express amp. Good amp and turntable don't matter yet. The bare concrete walls still make everything sound like......uh a cave.
 

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Sorry to dredge up an old thread, it's relevant to what I'm hoping for. And I apologize for the length in advance, but it's late and I may not be succinct

But first things first:
I packed up everything and moved up north.

Anyone who considers W. Virginia "up north" is a good southern boy.

Some background on my reply to this old post:
In the past year, life has sent a reminder of my mortality in the form of colorectal cancer, stage 3 or 4 depending on which Dr we talked to. Any reader over 50 who hasn't had a colonoscopy, just go do it. NOW. Do not stop, do not pass go, go directly to your doctor and have it done.
I haven't reacted much to the situation, I just listen, do what the Dr says and do my best to keep going like normal as much as possible. On the positive, after a round of combined radiation and chemo, the last PET scan showed no signs of cancer left. I just finished an additional 20 weeks of chemotherapy and am waiting on another PET, then surgery to remove the offending area.

Which brings us to the reason for the reply to this old post:
I began to think of what was truly important to me and my family, and what can be disposed of or ignored. Our house is pretty small, 3 BR and one of them has been stuffed to the gills with LP's, electronics sitting idle, etc. That was supposed to be "my" room, but had become too packed to be very useful.

As I was reflecting on things I haven't done, and are truly important to me personally, I realized that I have never built a hifi system like I began to envision decades ago. Life interrupted and I didn't have the space, time or funds- all went on the back burner. I still don't have the space, time or funds... or do I?
So, I decided to make the time, even if in small blocks. I don't have much extra space in the house, and that can't be resolved. I still don't have the money, but I have a lot of audio odds and ends collected over the years- a good start. I have a few tools, enough to build most of what I think I want.
As I envision what this would look like, I think "I would have to build this stuff out in the shop, and it's a wreck." In the shop... my tools are out there... I have shop!... it's filthy, no electricity... it's also a 20x30 metal building on a concrete pad... now that could be a good listening room...

Time of reckoning. I hadn't done much with the shop in the last 10 years, was getting ready to start wiring it back then. I had dreams of a place to work on cars, electronics, and area for wood working, painting, fiberglass work... but teenagers can change your plans when least expected.

What's most important? I want a damn listening room and somewhere to work on my audio stuff!!! And a 20'x30' room should do just fine. I could actually have a nice big room for listening to music, separate from the house! A calm feeling came over me.

So, I decided to give up my old aspirations and do those other things under the carport or outside. The only compromise is that my beat up '75 Alfa Romeo will have to remain inside. I'll put it on casters so it can be moved around to a convenient location. That way I can look at it while listening.

Yeah, that's it. HiFi as big as I want it, an electronics bench or two, and some shelves for components and LP's. And some walls. And a ceiling. Carpet would be nice, that concrete floor wouldn't be too great.

This has to be done with virtually no budget, but that's not a deterrent. That will slow me down, but it can be done.

Tubelab, if you have made progress on your basement, I'd love to see pics for any ideas. Given the amount of effect the listening environment has on the experience, I'm surprised we don't have a forum for dealing with acoustics of our listening areas. Or at least more discussion on the subject.

I've been working on cleaning the place out for a few weekends, de-cluttering as long as I can hold out. I can't work fast right now, but I can put in a slow and steady full day. Next will be a thorough cleaning, and weatherproofing/varmit-proofing to keep out bugs, mice and snakes. (We're rural here- there was a nice, big king snake up against the building just last week, and I killed two moccasins out in the yard last year) The biggest issue here will be dealing with the two roll-up metal garage doors.

After that, a sheet rock ceiling, then walls and electricity. I'm considering running electricity in conduit on the outside of the walls to avoid dealing with the steel framework of the building that will be behind the walls.

I'm interested in any suggestions or tips for construction, wiring, floor/ceiling/wall treatments, ways to improve acoustics, etc.
 

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Anyone who considers W. Virginia "up north" is a good southern boy.

I lived the first 62 years of my life in South Florida, which isn't southern, northern or a Caribbean Island, but that's where most of the people are from. Virtually nobody living there was born there, and most of my high school buddies moved farther away than I did. I left Miami after HS for Ft. Lauderdale, a big 25 mile move. My lineage however is southern fried redneck. Mom's family is from East Point Georgia, and before that Memphis. Dad's, rural Chattanooga, before that, a farm in the Tennessee hills.

Tubelab, if you have made progress on your basement, I'd love to see pics for any ideas

Less than favorable financial circumstances have prevented most of the basement man cave build out. The only major addition was a second studio desk built for a total of about $200. All the audio / video workstation and all of the related equipment migrated to the new desk and toe old one is mostly for web and electrical engineering work.

I'm surprised we don't have a forum for dealing with acoustics of our listening areas. Or at least more discussion on the subject.

There has been some discussion scattered throughout some threads, but there is plenty of info on YouTube and other web sites, but like any audio related stuff, much of it is conflicting. Look for sites related to home theater rooms or home recording studios. The HT stuff is more concerned with keeping sound from escaping, primarily bass, while the home studio stuff tries to keep all external sounds out.

This basement is a giant heat sink in the winter leading to $500+ heating bills, so insulation and sheetrock (or wood) is the first order of business.

I began to think of what was truly important to me and my family, and what can be disposed of or ignored.

I had this realization when both my parents passed, and my mother in law passed. We had to clean out their houses and sort/sell/ or otherwise dispose of their junk. I knew that my career was on life support, and we didn't want to stay in South Florida, so we began the huge purge project.

The only compromise is that my beat up '75 Alfa Romeo will have to remain inside.

My initial plan was to prepare my 500+ HP 73 Dodge Challenger for a trip north, but every time I worked on it, I wound up bloody. I have what my coworkers called "old peoples skin." A simple bump, or even carrying a heavy object results in a bruise, and I can get a cut from cardboard. It would be rather useless on these rural roads, so sadly, I sold it.

I started Medicare this year, eliminating a $1K/month health insurance bill and Social Security will start at age 62 (6 months) so the economic outlook is improving.

but teenagers can change your plans when least expected.

So can older kids. My 37 year old daughter moved into a house we were going to sell with 4 kids and we are supporting all of them.
 

Pano

Administrator
Paid Member
2004-10-07 6:05 am
Panama
Hey Tim. That's a big package of bad and good news. You seem to be dealing well - and your goals for the listening space makes good sense to audio fans like us. It's going to be fun, but a lot of work.

A few years back I converted a 1 car garage to my listening room. I did all the work myself, except pouring the floor and the carpet. I did the sheetrock, paint the HVAC, the electrical and lighting. It wasn't too hard, but took awhile. Here is the thread: A last! My listening room. A good day.

The main problem with sheetrock (gypsum board) is that acoustically, it sucks. Looks nice, but sounds horrible, as you probably know. It really ruined the acoustics of the garage, and I had to work hard to restore it. What's better? A lot of things, but those things cost money. Sheetrock has that horrible Ping! sound to it - it sounds as cheap as it is. Wood and stone sound much better, even terracotta tile sounds good, and can sometimes be found surplus or recycled.

I assume you'll put the speakers along the short wall, with the garage doors off to one side? How will you deal with the doors? I just got rid of mine and put a decoupled wall in its place. One fun thing you can do with the garage doors is make them the wall behind the speakers, and then play with them open and closed to hear the difference. It can be dramatic. Or flip it and have the garage doors behind you, either open or closed. Also interesting to hear the difference have reflection from behind you makes. A quick demo of the LEDE debate!

After my garage listening room, I had an actual man cave. A lava cave in Hawaii. Amazing acoustics, some of the best I've ever heard, but it was a damp, dark dirty place. A cave, you know. But it was mine, all mine.
Caveman Speakers. The Troglodytes.
 
I lived the first 62 years of my life in South Florida, which isn't southern, northern or a Caribbean Island
Indeed. I have told my wife that we're in the deepest of the deep south. Much farther and you're in Florida and (except for select areas of north FL) Florida isn't really the South.
Less than favorable financial circumstances have prevented most of the basement man cave build out.
Sorry to hear that, and I feel your pain!
There has been some discussion scattered throughout some threads, but there is plenty of info on YouTube and other web sites, but like any audio related stuff, much of it is conflicting. Look for sites related to home theater rooms or home recording studios. The HT stuff is more concerned with keeping sound from escaping, primarily bass, while the home studio stuff tries to keep all external sounds out.

This basement is a giant heat sink in the winter leading to $500+ heating bills, so insulation and sheetrock (or wood) is the first order of business.
Good advice, I'll look that way with a skeptical eye. I haven't googled yet because I trust the knowledge base here, and my own intuition over much of blind web searches. Good folks here, and an enormous collection of intelligence.

My initial plan was to prepare my 500+ HP 73 Dodge Challenger

Now you should know we need Mopar pics if you have them. 340, or did you transplant a big block?

Hey Tim. That's a big package of bad and good news. You seem to be dealing well - and your goals for the listening space makes good sense to audio fans like us. It's going to be fun, but a lot of work.
That's just life, man. Don't dwell- learn and keep moving forward.

Work is expected. My dad showed my brothers and I that you can do most anything you want. He built his office, our two story weekend house at the beach, most of his 3500 sq ft house, a 26' sailboat, all without missing a day of work. Rebuilt a few cars and a couple of planes, too. Nights and weekends were non stop. He's almost 85 now and just finished replacing two sets of ~8ft windows in the house, falling off a scaffold in the process. Back on it the next day.
Because of him, I don't feel like something is really mine unless I built it, or at least fixed it.

A few years back I converted a 1 car garage to my listening room. I did all the work myself, except pouring the floor and the carpet. I did the sheetrock, paint the HVAC, the electrical and lighting.
Cool, that's what I'm looking for. You have some good trees to help with the Florida sun. And some great Altecs.

The main problem with sheetrock (gypsum board) is that acoustically, it sucks. Looks nice, but sounds horrible, as you probably know.
Wood and stone sound much better, even terracotta tile sounds good.

I never really thought about sheetrock being that bad, but I will agree. That's why I'm asking here.

Stone could be an option, my father has a small mountain of Alabama field stone left from building his house. But it's fairly thick, probably add 4-6 inches of wall thickness and would certainly raise the ante for the remainder of the design. Not sure if I'm up for mixing that much mortar, either.

Hmm... a wainscoting of stone 3-4 feet high would add some cool color/texture, but would require a proper complement above. Wood would be perfect, something with a bit of rough texture. I'll have to look around, that much wood is probably not in my budget unless scavenged.

Certainly something to think about, as is terracotta...
I assume you'll put the speakers along the short wall, with the garage doors off to one side? How will you deal with the doors? I just got rid of mine and put a decoupled wall in its place. One fun thing you can do with the garage doors is make them the wall behind the speakers, and then play with them open and closed to hear the difference. It can be dramatic. Or flip it and have the garage doors behind you, either open or closed. Also interesting to hear the difference have reflection from behind you makes. A quick demo of the LEDE debate!

Not sure that I want to remove the doors, but I know weatherproofing and noise control will be a challenge with them. I may be able to add damping or panels to them. We have a lot of nice weather here, and I do like to open it up fully and just hang out. Outside noise is a non-issue, we're surrounded by at least several hundred acres of cow pasture and cotton fields with very little traffic. It's a pleasant place to be.

My initial thought has been to have the speakers on the wide wall, with the doors to my back. I have considered the short wall as well, and that's part of what brought me to search the forum. Aesthetics would place them on the wider wall in back, at least for symmetry. As long as there are electrical outlets available, I could move things around a bit anyway. Workbenches and such will be on wheels for mobility.

After my garage listening room, I had an actual man cave. A lava cave in Hawaii.

And there are no words to describe my jealousy.
 
340, or did you transplant a big block?

It was originally a 318 car, but the previous owners stuck the 440 in. Unfortunately that seemed to be their only competent move. There were many mistakes in the their build resulting in mid 14's quarter mile times WITH nitrous. A 440 Challenger with a bone stock engine and good tires should do mid 13's.

Their best "expert" move.....It was common practice in the day to stick a bolt or other spacer behind the accumulator spring in the Torqueflite 727 to improve full throttle shifts......they used a wooden dowel which mostly disintegrated, leading to a clogged valve body and burnt clutches. The torque converter was wrong for the cam and rear gears in the car, but I changed all 3 anyway.

I had rebuilt the entire powertrain such that block long smoky burnouts were easy, but never finished the interior or remaining body work. 60+ hour work weeks during the last few years of my career let the car degrade from what you see here and the brand new Powermaster starter had frozen preventing the car from starting. The headers had to be removed to remove the starter, but several tries resulted in blood loss, and I eventually sold the car.

we need Mopar pics if you have them.

Here are a few from the build.....I have hundreds from the Mopar Nationals in Columbus over the years, but they aren't exactly diyAudio material, unless a Hemi making a 10 second pass is considered HiFi!

1) toasted steels from slipping clutches due to clogged valve body.
2) Torqueflite 727, some assembly required
3) Torqueflite, last major piece.....almost done
4) install time......open wide......
5) eat this!
6) missing parts go here. At this point I could pick up the front of the car to move it.
7) some parts installed
8) New shiny stuff in the rear too
9) will it work?....first test.
10) YESSSSS!
 

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