large baffle loudspeaker

I was thinking about a larger bookshelf acting as a room divider. The dimensions could be around 5.5 x 11.5 feet or slightly larger. Instead of just putting my loudspeakers in front of it I was thinking one could use that structure as large baffle loudspeaker greatly reducing the diffraction (side edges could be also rounded). At least the front wall could be constructed as a smooth baffle (everything recessed) but also the back could be fairly smooth with doors/drawers for the portions not used as speaker enclosure.
I do not intend it as a open baffle speaker (will use the space behind it). So how would it work: like speakers built in wall or more like freestanding loudspeakers. Any examples of speakers like I am planning?
 
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AllenB

Moderator
Paid Member
2008-10-18 11:31 am
Such a wide baffle will probably hold the radiation in half space low enough that the room cuts in, I might look at it as equivalent to wall mounting and so wouldn't expect much need for adjustment/compensation per se. Subs are another story.

Dealing with higher frequencies and diffraction by gently taking the baffle back might not be possible I expect because the bookshelf will have a flat back panel. I wouldn't be sure of the benefit of rounding this far out, at least at the highest frequencies I'd experiment with something absorbent over the baffle around the driver.
 
Creating a realistic sound stage often requires toe-in of the speakers to beam-cross just in front of the main listeners. Some speakers have a modest weight TM top cabinet to help aim the higher freq polar lobe at the listeners. Bass wavelengths which are several feet long are less angle critical, but woofer direction control can sometimes reduce room bass modes.

You could use fixed angle position speakers set for one listening spot, or engineer in rotation capability.
 

Monteverdi

Member
2011-11-16 1:53 am
Creating a realistic sound stage often requires toe-in of the speakers to beam-cross just in front of the main listeners. Some speakers have a modest weight TM top cabinet to help aim the higher freq polar lobe at the listeners. Bass wavelengths which are several feet long are less angle critical, but woofer direction control can sometimes reduce room bass modes.

You could use fixed angle position speakers set for one listening spot, or engineer in rotation capability.

I was planning a front which is not completely flat but a surface which could be angled inward but likely not a perfect toe-in for the listening position. The mid/high bending wave drivers I am developing presently have a quite wide dispersion pattern, quite close to flat at 30º
 
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