Inductor estimation?

Lucky enough I found two inductors in the garage, steel laminate, with the number
201 175Z1108 and the number 30 on it a bit further and smaller printed.
Its dimensions are (steel laminate only) 55mm wide, 66mm high 23mm thick
With the windings, the thickness is about 44mm
height of the winding 30mm and 41mm wide.
thickness of the wire is 1.7mm, incl. the varnish , that calculates to 2.27mm²
So I think this is 14 gauge wire (1.63mm / 2.08mm²)
With a basic DMM I measure no resistance at all, even if I put both in series, still 0.0 Ohm...

How can I estimate the inductance of this inductor?

Bart
 
If you have a scope (or DVM with accurate AC response) and signal generator, it is not too hard to do a rough measurement.

Remember that the impedance of an inductor is 2pi f L.

If you set the signal generator to say 1V output, and connect it to the inductor via a 1K resistor, you will get 1mA of current (lets call this I), provide the impedance is much less than 1K. Adjust the frequency so that the voltage (lets call this V) on the inductor is less than say 100mV. At this frequency, the impedance is V/I.

Divide the impedance by 2pi x frequency, and you have the inductance (fairly roughly).
 
Magura said:



Yes, a lot more info....how many turns, DCR, properties of the core.....


Why don't you just find some guy with a LCR meter and measure it?

Magura :)
All that is in the first post, except for the #turns, but that would be ridiculous because I would have to unwind it to find out. :rolleyes:
An LCR meter would be nice, he he! :D
Maybe I should just buy one...


PigletsDad said:
If you have a scope (or DVM with accurate AC response) and signal generator, it is not too hard to do a rough measurement.

Remember that the impedance of an inductor is 2pi f L.

If you set the signal generator to say 1V output, and connect it to the inductor via a 1K resistor, you will get 1mA of current (lets call this I), provide the impedance is much less than 1K. Adjust the frequency so that the voltage (lets call this V) on the inductor is less than say 100mV. At this frequency, the impedance is V/I.

Divide the impedance by 2pi x frequency, and you have the inductance (fairly roughly).
Thanks for the 'how to' I'll have to try that in the weekend. :cool:

Bart.