Headphone socket for thick front plate?

Hi,
I would like to install a jack 6.35mm socket for headphone through a thick front plate (8mm). So far the longest 'going-through' that I found is 9mm long (9-10mm diameter), too short to screw it within the front plate. The other option would be to use a xlr-style socket from outside the plate (but around 20mm diameter).
Wondering if someone knows a non-xlr-style socket that could fit?
Thanks
 
Ubergeeknz,
Thanks for your reply.
Thought about something like that, but would likely require something like a straight shank drill (not sure about the name in English, edit: milling cutter). Have only normal drills here. Also, would prefer to 'drill' the back side, not the rear one (edit2: ok, rear and back are the same).
 
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There are "looooong" 6.35 mm jacks designed for guitar body mounting, because wood is too fragile to be routed down to 1 or 1.5 mm thick to hold a regular (sheet metal panel) jack or they plain need to reach the internal controls cavity.

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search for them at Guitar/Music supply houses, not standard Electonics ones.

This one is from:
Switchcraft Barrel Female Jack Socket for Acoustic Guitars (Stereo) - Andertons Music Co.
 
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Ubergeeknz,
Thanks for your reply.
Thought about something like that, but would likely require something like a straight shank drill (not sure about the name in English, edit: milling cutter). Have only normal drills here. Also, would prefer to 'drill' the back side, not the rear one (edit2: ok, rear and back are the same).


Standard end-mill cutters cannot drill, but ones are available designed to drill, called centre-cut end-mills or slot-drills.
 

H713

Member
2017-11-24 11:21 pm
Madison WI
End-mills work excellent for counterboring and even drilling, with a few caveats. First, make sure the workpiece is well clamped, and I don't mean with a squeeze clamp. I mean held in a vise that is bolted to the t-slots in a mill or drill press table. If you're using a mill, lock the table. It's also best to hold the end mill in a collet if at all possible.

If it's aluminum, some form of fluid is a necessity to prevent chip welding. This is one of the few things that WD-40 actually works well for. Kerosene, works well too, however the fumes are significantly worse.

Don't even think about trying this with a hand drill.