Good 2.5" fullrange?

Hi!

I just purchased this kind of a Sony CMT-X3CD for our kitchen: Wireless Hi-Fi Audio System for Home | CMT-X3CD | Sony AU

It's quite good looking, small enough, and has FM radio, CD, USB & bluetooth, so feature wise it's quite OK cheap "system" for a for kitchen. There aren't many other options on this size & price level anyway. But the problem is that it's sound quality actually quite bad; mids & highs are harsh and there isn't even a hint of the basses. So naturally I opened it, and noticed that I could quite easily fit some 2.5" full range drivers to replace the 2" original Sony's.

So my questions are;
- Do you think that I could get a bit better sound and even a hint of basses with some good quality fullrange drivers from it?
- If yes, which 8ohm 2.5" drivers would you recommend? Since it's just for background music & radio programs, I prefer musicality and easy-to-listen over analytical sound, and basses over high range details.

Few possible choices I already found are:
- FRS 7 S - 8 Ohm
- Data sheet - 830984 | Loudspeaker freaks
- Datasheet - ND65-8 | Loudspeaker freaks

All hints are highly appreciated! :=)
 
If you have opened it up find out what amplifier chip it is using.

I am guessing that it's going to be a class D monolithic design. This will no doubt include over current and over temperature protection. Connecting a 4 ohm loudspeaker isn't likely to cause any damage and just because it's using 8 ohm units does not mean that 4 ohm ones aren't suitable.

If you can see what the amplifier chip is (take photos of the PCB if you're not sure) then that makes thing simple as you can take a look at the datasheet.
 
Is this it inside?

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Usually designs that include PRs aren't bass shy, or rather, don't have 'not a hint of bass' as the systems are designed specifically to exploit the PRs to get some bass.
 
If you have opened it up find out what amplifier chip it is using.

I am guessing that it's going to be a class D monolithic design. This will no doubt include over current and over temperature protection. Connecting a 4 ohm loudspeaker isn't likely to cause any damage and just because it's using 8 ohm units does not mean that 4 ohm ones aren't suitable.

If you can see what the amplifier chip is (take photos of the PCB if you're not sure) then that makes thing simple as you can take a look at the datasheet.

Unfortunately the PCB is behind the CD player so that it's not easily accessible and I cannot see it at all. But if you really think that this kind of amps have enough protection, maybe I could give it a try...
 
The SB has a really well engineered motor with class leading non linear distortion performance. It easily extends up to 20kHz too without any breakup beforehand. I've used it a number of times and it sounds sublime.

If bass is your priority though the ND65 would be the better choice as it's T/S parameters fit better for that.
 
Yeah, it really might not be a good idea. I have now read some articles on both SB and ND65, and I think that I'll go for the SB anyway.

But one more question still; SB's specifications say that it will down to 140hz on a sealed 0.5 - 1 litre box. Sony has a bit under 1 litre vented boxes, so should I try to use it's reflex pipes to get a bit more lower basses? I tried this calculator, and it suggests that on a 1 litre vented box the "cut-off" frequency at -3db would be around 80hz: mh-audio.nl - Vented System.

Can it really be true? Or would it still be better to use sealed boxes?
 
If the Sony already has reflex ports installed then there is no harm in trying with and without them.

From a technical point of view the SB drivers aren't ideally suited to ported cabinets but SBs parameters are supposed to be a little off. In reality the actual driver is supposed to have lower Qts and lower sensitivity, this does make it more suitable for ported boxes but that all depends on the quality control for the driver.