Fe103en in a ( BIB) OR (T.L.)

Hello everyone,

The reason I am writing this posted question is because, I was told by a company (T.L.) wouldn't work using a fostex driver. I thought ( the late Terry Cain used a (BIB-T.L.) or I"m I wrong? (Still learning) I have never meet the man but, I know a lot of you think very highly of him. So which box would give me the best of the best? A (T.L.) or the (BIB)? Thank you everyone for all your help. My projects would not be possible with out all of you helping me out. Cheers N.S.
 
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Hello everyone,

The reason I am writing this posted question is because, I was told by a company (T.L.) wouldn't work using a fostex driver. I thought ( the late Terry Cain used a (BIB-T.L.) or I"m I wrong? (Still learning) I have never meet the man but, I know a lot of you think very highly of him. So which box would give me the best of the best? A (T.L.) or the (BIB)? Thank you everyone for all your help. My projects would not be possible with out all of you helping me out. Cheers N.S.



define "work"
define "TL" - that''s a generic term used to describe (sometimes inaccurately), a wide range of 1/4 wave resonant enclosure topologies.

The FE103 has long been a sweetheart model, but regardless of enclosure type, with all its qualities, will never be a high powered bass monster. It is well suited to nearfield monitor, and I had a lot of fun with the old RadioShack version ( RS40-1197) a dozen or so years ago in a nifty little bipole design by Bert Doppenberg

BD-Pipes


A BIB is a type of horn which Terry made popular well over a decade ago - he also build the Abby (Voigt "pipe"), which would likely be classified or modeled today as an MLTL, and several back loaded manifold / horns. AFAIK the only Fostex driver smaller than the FE16x series that he ever used was the FF85K in the little desk top Noogi (think 1/3 scale Abby), and the FE108Z in something called the MiniMe that might have not made it pass prototype/ demo stage. It's certainly not in Jason Flannery's (Lovecraft) current stock models.


edit: Scott beat me to it while I was digging for the above link and got distracted while researching Jason's current work
 
Thank you both for your research and input. I was just looking to use the Fe103en drivers just for back round music and reg. everyday listening. I know you would have to have a helper woofer for the lower end.I just wanted to be on the right page working with these drivers. Again thanks for all you help. N.S.
 
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Depends on what you mean by 'best.' You can squeeze LF out of the FE103En, but the fact is, it's not going to thank you for it. If you insist, the BIB (which is a pipe-horn) is probably the most straightforward means of doing it.


Well I saw a (T.L.) for them on you tube from (PWK DESIGNS)? It Looked very cool and what I am after? So I bought the drivers. So now I am looking to get the most out if this little drivers with out hurting them. Also I am building these for my wife as a gift so Then she can turn on the radio and Jam to her tunes. N.s.


Here's the link,

My Other Listening Room - YouTube
 
Nat Sound,
The TL that you see on the video may look cool, and the guy is a good wood worker, but I believe the sound will not be good. A typical open ended straight line like that will have a lot of peaks and dips and big gain at one frequency. You should look into a design that has been modeled and has been built on this forum for the best bet in good sound. A Voigt pipe or MLTL will give the cleanest sound, the BIB can work but will have a rougher looking frequency response. This may work well in a rear facing horn.
 
I ran a sim of the TL shown in the video based on estimated dimensions of 4 x 5 in CSA x 80 in long with an open end facing front. The results are not very pretty, it may go deep to 30 Hz as the guy on the video says but at the expense of smoothness of the frequency response which has a big hole right after the 30 Hz peak. Next, I optimized it as a MLTL and find that you can't really push the FE103EN much below 60 Hz, however the response is much better. The design is as follows: 5 in wide baffle x 7.5 in deep x 31 in long, driver at 6.2 in from top, vent is 2.75 in dia x 3.75 in long located at 9 in from bottom and front firing. With stuffing in top 2/3rds, all those little dips and peaks in the higher frequencies should smooth out. There is a 0.6 mH x 3 ohm BSC included here to tame the high end.
 

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Nat Sound,
The TL that you see on the video may look cool, and the guy is a good wood worker, but I believe the sound will not be good. A typical open ended straight line like that will have a lot of peaks and dips and big gain at one frequency. You should look into a design that has been modeled and has been built on this forum for the best bet in good sound. A Voigt pipe or MLTL will give the cleanest sound, the BIB can work but will have a rougher looking frequency response. This may work well in a rear facing horn.

Thanks for your insights on my post. I will search the Voigt Pipes and their plans for my drivers. Thanks again. N.S.
 
I ran a sim of the TL shown in the video based on estimated dimensions of 4 x 5 in CSA x 80 in long with an open end facing front. The results are not very pretty, it may go deep to 30 Hz as the guy on the video says but at the expense of smoothness of the frequency response which has a big hole right after the 30 Hz peak. Next, I optimized it as a MLTL and find that you can't really push the FE103EN much below 60 Hz, however the response is much better. The design is as follows: 5 in wide baffle x 7.5 in deep x 31 in long, driver at 6.2 in from top, vent is 2.75 in dia x 3.75 in long located at 9 in from bottom and front firing. With stuffing in top 2/3rds, all those little dips and peaks in the higher frequencies should smooth out. There is a 0.6 mH x 3 ohm BSC included here to tame the high end.


Thanks for taking time out your life to help me. N.S.
 
I ran a sim of the TL shown in the video based on estimated dimensions of 4 x 5 in CSA x 80 in long with an open end facing front. The results are not very pretty, it may go deep to 30 Hz as the guy on the video says but at the expense of smoothness of the frequency response which has a big hole right after the 30 Hz peak. Next, I optimized it as a MLTL and find that you can't really push the FE103EN much below 60 Hz, however the response is much better. The design is as follows: 5 in wide baffle x 7.5 in deep x 31 in long, driver at 6.2 in from top, vent is 2.75 in dia x 3.75 in long located at 9 in from bottom and front firing. With stuffing in top 2/3rds, all those little dips and peaks in the higher frequencies should smooth out. There is a 0.6 mH x 3 ohm BSC included here to tame the high end.

I had a request for a drawing of the MLTL. See below. Port is 7 in from bottom not 9 as there is typo above.
 

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I had a request for a drawing of the MLTL. See below. Port is 7 in from bottom not 9 as there is typo above.


Again I can't thank you enought for all you have done. This is way I like this forum and only am part of just this forum. All you guys and gals understand and don't mind helping me out. Cheers N.S.
:D

P.s. Here's a link to a bass reflex design I have been eyeing from 2005 :hypno2:. The La Petite Fostex Fe 103 Bass Reflex Speakers.

La Petite Audiophile
 
I have the Org. plans in french that was sent to me. They do look a lot different then the ones that are a floor standing bass reflex. Also Scottmoose are you the one who has that speaker design for the Fostex Fe103en drivers called the sperrin Speakers? I have a friend who would like to build them? So how can he get a hold of you to pay you for the palns to make them? If this is not you sorry for the mix up? N.S.
 
Sorry, missed this earlier. Yes, but I don't talk about them on the forum since I'm here strictly as a DIYer; your friend can get me through my email address (you'll find it on the Sperrin page).

I always did have a fondness for the Short Sperrin. Completely conservative (deliberately so) design, but made a good engine testbed. My perverse liking for aircraft that are often forgotten I suppose. The Gloster Javelin is another: the most sinister sounding aircraft ever built, guaranteed to scare all children within ten miles to death -especially at night. Sounded like all the lost souls in Nifleheim.