DIY replace jack plug: strange colors

JeffreyR

Member
2013-05-12 6:39 pm
Hello Everyone :)

I have a PHILIPS SHP2000 headphone. The jack plug is broken. So am trying to fix it. I also have a grey audio cable with a jack plug on each side. So i thought if i cut off the plug from the headphone and cut off 1 plug from the audio cable and connect the two wires then i will even have a longer headphone wire :cool:

The strange thing is. The audio cable wire has the normal red sleeved, white sleeved and no sleeved cables within the main grey sleeve. But the headphone cable is strange :eek:
The headphone cable had two black sleeved cables.
1 black sleeves cable contains: a blue and green string of wires.
the other black sleeved cable: contains red and copper colored string wires.
The individual wires are actually colored. No sleeves around them. How does that work :confused: My mind is blown. :hypno2:

Thank you guys very much in advance for the advice :)
 

Amperage

Member
2013-03-29 5:39 am
Or just heat the wire end with the iron. The heat burns the varnish off allowing it to be soldered.

One thing to add.. I use this method myself because it's fast but the heat needed to burn off the coating will also weaken/thin the insulating coating 1/4" or more past the point you applied the heat so be careful that length doesn't rest against something that could possibly short. or add a length of heat shrink tubing to insulate that area better.
 

Mooly

Administrator
Paid Member
2007-09-15 8:14 am
Identifying L and R is easy with a meter. Identifying phase :D I think you would have to listen and swap one pair over to see which was the correct phase.

There probably is some standard for these but I would want to be sure by listening.
 

Mooly

Administrator
Paid Member
2007-09-15 8:14 am
I'm not sure there is a standard for this.

Identifying the L and R pairs is easy with a DVM on ohms/diode range. They will click very loudly.

1/ Connect one wire from the left earphone to the plug tip.
2/ Connect one wire from the right earphone to the plug centre.
3/ Connect the two remaining wires to the plug body.

Listen to the phones on MONO speech (radio ?) and if it sounds 'phasey' without a distinct centre image then reverse the connections to ONE earphone only.
 

allen02

Member
2015-04-14 5:09 am
I'm not sure there is a standard for this.

Identifying the L and R pairs is easy with a DVM on ohms/diode range. They will click very loudly.

1/ Connect one wire from the left earphone to the plug tip.
2/ Connect one wire from the right earphone to the plug centre.
3/ Connect the two remaining wires to the plug body.

Listen to the phones on MONO speech (radio ?) and if it sounds 'phasey' without a distinct centre image then reverse the connections to ONE earphone only.

Idk how to use this DVM on ohms/diode range. i need another method.
but i'll try the
1/ Connect one wire from the left earphone to the plug tip.
2/ Connect one wire from the right earphone to the plug centre.
3/ Connect the two remaining wires to the plug body.

then after i'll see if its correct sounding or not.
:):):):):):):):)
 

allen02

Member
2015-04-14 5:09 am
@mooly
idk if this is correct way
found this on yahoo answers.

Open them up to see which wire is which. I think red is + and copper is -. Then look on the other side to see what wire is where the red would go. Maybe blue is + and green is -. Let's say red/copper is left cup then red to tip and copper to sleeve. Then blue to ring and green to sleeve for right cup.
 

Mooly

Administrator
Paid Member
2007-09-15 8:14 am
Yes, if you can open them up then its 100% certainty with getting things correct. You can't guarantee though that all headphones will be identical, that why I mentioned earlier that I didn't think there was a recognised standard for this.

Certainly though you can wire it like that, and it is the logical way for 'red to be plus'. Then give them a listen. If they are OK then all is well. If not then swap just the blue/green over.