Defining full range magic

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Be interesting to hear what others think is the reasons that full range speakers have that magical quality.

My take on it is that a musical note whether sung or played by an instrument is a more complex sound than one would suppose. A piano for instance has a hammer striking a string. So there is another sound or frequency than just the note itself. If this broader spectrum of sound falls over the range of a multi way speaker's cross over network something is lost or at least recessed.

So my admittedly simplistic idea is that a full range speaker has a seamless, lively presentation that a multi way speaker often cannot deliver. I doubt that I will be going back to multi way speakers because I value this quality highly. My coniston^2's are making me exceedingly happy. My family and friends find them remarkable as well.
 
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My take on it is that a musical note whether sung or played by an instrument is a more complex sound than one would suppose.
Look up 'Timbre' and 'Harmonics'

If this broader spectrum of sound falls over the range of a multi way speaker's cross over network something is lost or at least recessed.
Or sometimes accentuated from overlap.

My family and friends find them remarkable as well.
In the end that's all that matters, right? :)
 
either learn how to squeeze bass from them , or add woof helper

;)
That's what I have done (with a lot of help from Planet10).
:lifesavr:
But, doesn't that make it a 2-way speaker with a woofer and a high woof/mid/tweeter aka 'Full'-Range?
When I see a 'Full-Range' speaker with a woof added for bass and a tweeter sitting on top of the cab.......
Probably real 'Fullrange' is just not physically possible?
John
 
I would agree with Planet10 on the idea of seamless. After all, musical instruments were invented to mimic the first musical instrument: The human voice. No crossover there.
Actually, there kind of is - its called "passagio". There are different vocal registers, and part of vocal training is learning to move seamlessly from one register to another without breaks. If you've heard someone yodel - thats an example of moving from register to register with a pronounced break. Although you could make a good argument that the voice is the ultimate musical instrument, you could also make the argument that its kind of like trying to make music with a vacuum cleaner attached to a balloon - none of the parts were originally intended for quite that purpose and it ain't so easy.
 
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