Can playing playing poor quality records damage my stylus?

HarryY

Member
2017-08-05 12:57 am
NY
I've been away from LP's for 20 years and I recently picked up a new turntable
with an Ortofon 2M Blue cartridge and the replacement stylus is about $175

This may be a silly question but Can playing playing poor quality records damage my stylus?

I do wash any old albums that I've purchased to remove any grime and dirt.
But some are less than optimal (light scratches etc) and I would hate to cause
extra wear on the stylus. My turntable does have a removable headshell so if
need be I could have a second cartridge setup with a less costly stylus.

Thoughts and suggestions?

Thank you
 
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Scratches on a clean record can't harm the stylus.


Well _very_ large scratches can, as the stylus can catch on them, but that's extreme, a small scratch is just a large audio transient, some recordings already contain large transients...

All playing wears the stylus and the record. Dirt makes it worse for both, abrasive dirt is even worse.

Decks without auto-stop can wear the stylus in the run-out groove if left unatteded, and the run-out groove can collect a lot of dirt as its deep and the stylus dumps junk there at the end of every play.

Coloured vinyl and picture discs promote more wear as they don't contain carbon-black which is uses to lubricate standard black vinyl.
 

HarryY

Member
2017-08-05 12:57 am
NY

HarryY

Member
2017-08-05 12:57 am
NY
Well _very_ large scratches can, as the stylus can catch on them, but that's extreme, a small scratch is just a large audio transient, some recordings already contain large transients...

All playing wears the stylus and the record. Dirt makes it worse for both, abrasive dirt is even worse.

Decks without auto-stop can wear the stylus in the run-out groove if left unatteded, and the run-out groove can collect a lot of dirt as its deep and the stylus dumps junk there at the end of every play.

Coloured vinyl and picture discs promote more wear as they don't contain carbon-black which is uses to lubricate standard black vinyl.

All good information.

Thank you
 

HarryY

Member
2017-08-05 12:57 am
NY
I wound up getting the ATVM95C and mounted in the same type of headshell
that my Ortofon 2M Blue cartridge is in. I then added a 1.4 gram weight so it
would weight the same + .2 grams (for the hevier required tracking) so
I wouldn't need to reset the weight when I swapped cartridges.


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HarryY

Member
2017-08-05 12:57 am
NY
Exactly what I did! The new Audio Technica AT-VM95C may be upgraded, if/when necessary, simply by substituting a more advanced stylus profile from further up the range. However, the conical stylus is probably the best profile for playing LPs of unknown or sub-optimal quality.

For the price it's not a bad cartridge and the ability to upgrade it by just
changing the stylus is nice. The conical is nice not only for it's lower price
but may also tone down some of the crackles on poor quality records.

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This may sound counter intuitive or outright wacko but the secret to getting rid of the pops caused by scratches is, wait for it, sandpaper! Get a small (2" x 2") piece of 1500 grit wet/dry sand paper. Pour a cleaning solution (I use 25% 90 percent pure isopropl alcohol, 75% distilled water, and a few drops of Kodak Photo-Flo or any neutral pH detergent, on the scratched area. Working WITH the grooves and using a back and forth motion, lightly sand the affected area. What this does is knock off the jagged surfaces of the scratch that actually causes the tics and pops. When you're finished, rinse thoroughly with distilled water and vacuum or wipe dry.

I know this sounds crazy, but try it. I used a record that was pretty well trashed for my first attempts and was really pleased with the results.