best tweeter under 100 $-€ ?

Depends what you're doing. 'Best' doesn't mean anything unless you state the criteria you are using. What sort of 2 way? What sensitivity is needed? What midbass is being used (since this will influence the crossover frequency and therefore which tweeters will be capable of achieving it)? How complex a crossover is permissible (since if you use a tweeter without ferrofluid you may need to use an LCR notch on its F0 impedance peak)?
 
Or just stop using the work 'best'

What is the bass-mid you will use? Knowing that, one could seek for the best-matched tweeter....

Do try to think for yourself Luther. If there was one single 'best' tweeter, don't you think all the manufacturers would be using it?

The tweeter is just one of a number of elements that go to make up a good sounding speaker design.


that'd be Bingo, Yahtzee and correct-o-mundo on all three counts

I'd be inclined to follow Draki's advice - the two mating drivers might or not be from the same maker
 
Ive not heard the sb line but im a fan of the Vifa XT 25 line, especially the dual magnet versions. The top two in the line are very smooth and very low disortion. They compare vvery favorably to my much pricier Mundorf AMTs. They lack a roll off in the lastoctave, so must be carefully ba
anced, and also have narrower than usual dispersion, which I like, but may sound too dry for some.
 
Last edited:
Vifa XT25TG30-04, SB Acoustics SB29RDC-C000-4 or Usher 9950-20 / Dayton RS28F-4 (Dayton is the same driver but with a mesh grille - doesn't seem to affect how it performs in any way)

The XT25 has the flattest response (pretty much ruler flat!) but you are limited to crossing at 2-2.5kHz LR4 at any decent volume (>95dB SPL @ 1m) due to distortion rising on the low end. Off axis response falls off a bit faster than the average 1" dome tweeter.
The SB29 has a cleaner low end, and could cross at 1.5kHz LR4 but the frequency response is not as flat. It is a very efficient driver.
The Usher driver is somewhat of a compromise between both - frequency response is smoother than the SB29 but not as good as the XT25. Low end distortion is lower than the XT25 but not as good as the SB29.

All three have world-class distortion figures above 2.5kHz.

The Usher has one advantage that the other two don't have - it has a metal faceplate. I have had bad experiences with plastic faceplates warping over time and causing a coil rub issue (Vifa DX series especially) so I'm weary of full size plastic faceplate drivers where the bolts that go through the faceplate also clamp the diaphragm in place. For what it's worth, the drivers that had problems were being stored in cardboard boxes - they might have fared better if they were mounted to a rigid baffle.

There is also the XT25BG60-04 which has a second bucking magnet and I guess a slightly larger rear chamber (datasheet indicates a higher Fs though :confused:) which might equal ever so slightly lower distortion on the low end. I've never seen any conclusive measurements comparing them though.

Pyle do a good range of tweeters.
Come'on really? My impression of Pyle are that they are mostly glorified white van speakers. I've only tested one Pyle driver myself (Pyle PDMR9) but the distortion was so bad that it was basically unusable - there was a tiny range between 1kHz and 3kHz where the non-linear distortion was borderline acceptable. The flange is so huge that to maintain a reasonable CTC distance with the tweeter you'd want to cross no higher than 2kHz so basically you end up with a driver that only works from 1-2kHz, useless! After seeing my distortion measurements I had to double check that the coil wasn't rubbing - nope, just an extremely poorly designed motor system. Pyle claim "400Hz to 6kHz", yet anything under 1kHz at any acceptable volume (>80dB @ 1meter) drove it into bulk distortion. As such, I don't hold high hopes for any of their other dome drivers. Too bad, because the build quality actually is quite nice - big magnet, heavy cast face plate etc. Too bad they put zero effort into the actual acoustic engineering.
 
Last edited: