BC412 Subwoofer

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According to the video, "this uses a completely different alignment than anything we've done at Danley Labs"
Quad loaded FLH, large frontal boundary area.
Gets loud, rolls off below 40 Hz.
Also known as the "IHOP", intense horn of punch.
A fold pattern like this would probably get the FR it has with the right drivers:
 

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BC for Boundary Condotion 412? Kinda like B.D.E.A.P
Or it could be Before Christ, Mike Heddon does cater to the Christian market :D.
He seems to have dropped the former working name MIL 412 after the military failed to engage.
And correction to my post #3, the MIL 412/BC412/IHOP rolls off below 45.5 Hz, not 40 Hz.
 

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Hmm not much of a "sub" then. Looks to be the size of two (roughly) TH-118's (laid down on their sides, stacked on top of eachother)

Each sub does suit specific needs thou, so maybe this is a good option for someone needing LOUD above 45-50hz.
Judging by the popularity of subs here with similar LF corner, there is a much larger contingent of those willing to sacrifice low for LOUD.

Ivan Beaver wrote "It is 50x50" and 18 or 19" deep" .

The production model will probably be a different size, the prototype in the video was designed for some undisclosed military transport other than a Humvee.
 
I've heard this sub at the Danley offices at the speaker shootout event. They had several other manufacturers subs there to compare. It seems to me that this speaker is best suited for live bands that want a HARD hitting kick drum sound. It really does shine at this. I heard the TH118 and TH812 AB'd there too. The TH118 has a beautifully deep musical quality and the TH812 has extremely low and loud happening at the same time. But I can see me owning these just for my own rock band playing clubs. My dream rig would be a BC412 sub on an aux channel, with a TH118 low laying sideways on top of that with an SM80 mid/high on top of those two. Of course a TH812 would go deeper but it's hard to get a couple of them in a van. The BC412 is almost as loud and goes deep enough for most gigs.
 
Hi Dan, I didn't get a price out of them, but of course you can prob get in the ballpark looking at the other sub prices. 10-12k for a TH812? 3-4k for a TH118? I'd guess 8k, could be low. One box is really loud. Way more than two TH118's. I don't work for Danley and this is just a guess.
 
I've heard this sub at the Danley offices at the speaker shootout event. They had several other manufacturers subs there to compare. It seems to me that this speaker is best suited for live bands that want a HARD hitting kick drum sound. It really does shine at this. I heard the TH118 and TH812 AB'd there too. The TH118 has a beautifully deep musical quality and the TH812 has extremely low and loud happening at the same time. But I can see me owning these just for my own rock band playing clubs. My dream rig would be a BC412 sub on an aux channel, with a TH118 low laying sideways on top of that with an SM80 mid/high on top of those two. Of course a TH812 would go deeper but it's hard to get a couple of them in a van. The BC412 is almost as loud and goes deep enough for most gigs.

Couldn't that be a factor of room pressurization?
Geddes and John K have some threads on here, talking about how a loudspeaker pressurizes a room. And any monopole will pressurize a room differently than a dipole. (IE, a FLH is going to pressurize a room differently than a TH)

I go to a lot of EDM events, going back about 20 years, and the thing that's caught my attention is how a handful of events are bringing just *startling* amounts of speakers and power to shows. At this point, it's only about ten percent of the events that are turning bass into an arms race, but it seems like a DJ with a sub that could suck the air right out of your lungs would be a big draw on the EDM circuit.

I wish this was more common - at this point I can only count three or four events where this was happening. But clearly, it's now possible, especially with the combination of very high excursion neodymium prosound subs, and very very efficient amplifiers.
 
Couldn't that be a factor of room pressurization?
Geddes and John K have some threads on here, talking about how a loudspeaker pressurizes a room. And any monopole will pressurize a room differently than a dipole. (IE, a FLH is going to pressurize a room differently than a TH)
At this point, it's only about ten percent of the events that are turning bass into an arms race, but it seems like a DJ with a sub that could suck the air right out of your lungs would be a big draw on the EDM circuit.
Room "pressurization" down to DC can occur in small rooms with monopoles, but large rooms and outdoors inverse distance law applies.

Most of the "suck the air right out of your lungs" slamming and punching goes on upwards of 80 Hz, where the BC 412 shines, though it would require something below for pants flapping EDM, as it drops at about 20 dB per octave below 44 Hz.

At 106 dB one watt one meter, it is hot for a cabinet only 50 x 50 x 18 inches!
 

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