Autograph a small step from boat building...

Gilette

Member
2010-10-26 9:30 pm
Hi everyone!

I'm quite new to this forum, but I decided to join after reading the many wonderful posts by Max Lorenz. A few months ago I was in the opportunity to listen to a pair of Westminster Royals. As you can imagine I was blown away by the sound, and by the price tag! But since I'm not a novice where it comes to woodworking (boat building), I thought it might be cool to build a pair myself.

I gathered Max had the original plans from Tannoy, but these are no longer available. Now I found some crude plans on 44bx.com, but I'm not certain if these plans will get me anywhere.

So my question is: has anyone successfully used these drawings to actually build an Autograph? And, if so, are there any pitfalls I have to take into account?

Then there is the question of which drivers I could use best. Tannoys are out of the question, because I don't want to take the risk of buying someone elses headache.

And furthermore, would it be wise to start off with a pair of half scale or 2/3 scale models?

Dilemma's, dilemma's....

Greetings,
Frank
 
...
Then there is the question of which drivers I could use best. Tannoys are out of the question, because I don't want to take the risk of buying someone elses headache.

And furthermore, would it be wise to start off with a pair of half scale or 2/3 scale models?
...
If you don't want to use real original speaker drivers, how are you going to find and use "mini original speaker drivers", for your project. I would learn, with a fullrange (maybe a Tannoy driver or not) FullRangeDriver.com or www.diyaudio.com/forums/full-range/, or start with a plain 2/3-Way. Make sure not only the plans are available but also the drivers are in stock.

This site interesting for minis.
Mini JBLs
 
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Gilette

Member
2010-10-26 9:30 pm
If you don't want to use real original speaker drivers, how are you going to find and use "mini original speaker drivers", for your project.

Thanks for your suggestions.
I was referring to the Autograph cabinets rather than the speakers when I mentioned a 1/2 or 2/3 scale option. I've built some speaker cabinets before, (instrument speakers mainly) and the reason for trying to build a pair of Autographs this time is the challenging complexity of the project. I just want to find out if I can do it, so building a pair of conventional 2- of 3-way cabinets is not an option.

Thanks for the links though. I found some drivers by Radian that look promisin. With a 1/2 scale Autograph enclosure I could use an 8" coaxial. But other suggestions are welcome.

Frank
 
Greets!

Scaled down FLHs can make for entertaining computer speakers or mains if a wide BW 'sub' woofer system is used, but BLHs as a general rule don't take kindly to being scaled down much due to how it affects the driver specs required and as much as you want to downsize it may mean that no readily available cone driver can drive it well enough to actually listen to it without electrically rolling off most/all of the horn's gain BW.

GM
 

Gilette

Member
2010-10-26 9:30 pm
If you got the space and feel adventurous why not build Westminsters?
The driver would be the same as for Autographs…

Huh... Westminsters? I would like to, but I think I wouldn't be able to get into the room to listen to them. That's why I thought about the scaled (70%) version of the Autographs. If I could find some plans for the Westminsters though, maybe I could scale them down and fit a 12" Beyma or Radian.

no readily available cone driver can drive it well enough to actually listen to it without electrically rolling off most/all of the horn's gain

What do you mean? Would they lack bass at the lower end or overall? How about the cabinets made by Peter? Autograph for 12" GOLD by Peter
I mean, 70% of a huge horn would still leave a big horn, right?

Here's another thought: MDF or plywood?

Thank for the replies!
Frank
 
Hi everyone!

I'm quite new to this forum, but I decided to join after reading the many wonderful posts by Max Lorenz. A few months ago I was in the opportunity to listen to a pair of Westminster Royals. As you can imagine I was blown away by the sound, and by the price tag! But since I'm not a novice where it comes to woodworking (boat building), I thought it might be cool to build a pair myself.

I gathered Max had the original plans from Tannoy, but these are no longer available. Now I found some crude plans on 44bx.com, but I'm not certain if these plans will get me anywhere.

So my question is: has anyone successfully used these drawings to actually build an Autograph? And, if so, are there any pitfalls I have to take into account?

Then there is the question of which drivers I could use best. Tannoys are out of the question, because I don't want to take the risk of buying someone elses headache.

And furthermore, would it be wise to start off with a pair of half scale or 2/3 scale models?

Dilemma's, dilemma's....

Greetings,
Frank

Hi Frank,
I have also been following Max's posts on the Autograph's and have thought...........well, I can wish anyway. Neat stuff!
:D

This is OT but you mentioned: But since I'm not a novice where it comes to woodworking (boat building)...

There are two or three of us around here, and there may be more, that are interested in boatbuilding. What types of boats have you built?

Best Regards,
TerryO
 

Gilette

Member
2010-10-26 9:30 pm
Hi Terry & Jacco,

So far I've built an Atomite and, so far, half a Seababe. Plans for both boats can be found at Svenson's - Welcome, enjoy your visit! as you probably will know.

Here's my son in the Atomite:

album_pic.php


It's a bit off topic but I think the techniques involved are not that different. The only advantage in building speaker cabinets is that you don't have to use epoxy to seal them. I hate that stuff for the mess it makes, but I love what you can do with it.

Which reminds me: does anyone know if it would be possible to use epoxy and glass fiber to make midrange or high freq. horns? Has anyone tried this?

Have fun!
Frank
 
Very tricky to do with rovings, chopped strand stil requires a excellent scissor eye, piece of cake with spray-up.
(not sure why you'd want epoxy)

One advantage to epoxy is that it doesn't shrink as it hardens like ordinary polyester resins usually do. This makes it a lot easier to design for, as the mold can be the exact size as the horn and doesn't require calculations for shrinkage. The subsequent removal from the molds may be easier as a consequence. Epoxy may also be a bit stronger as well, although for this application polyester or epoxy would be more than strong enough.

The most important reason is that most wooden boatbuilders probably already have some epoxy lying around.

Best Regards,
TerryO